Amanda Kolson Hurley

BBC America

BBC's The Game Does for Brutalism What Mad Men Did for Mid-Century Design

The Cold War thriller on BBC America stars Brian Cox and Tom Hughes—and some excellent, surprisingly intimate Brutalist architecture.

jorisvo/Shutterstock.com

How Bremen, Germany, Became a Car-Sharing Paradise

The city aims to get 20,000 residents using its system by 2020.

Jim Saah

Celebrating D.C.'s Punk 'Salad Days'

Filmmaker Scott Crawford on the birth of hardcore in 1980s Washington.

Hank Shiffman/Shutterstock

Why Gas-Station Restaurants Are Great for Suburbs

A new crop of restaurants in gas stations, like Seoul Food D.C., will help suburbs grow into more authentic urban places.

Neighborhood Centers

How to Tackle Growing Suburban Poverty

Houston's Neighborhood Centers has spent years addressing this hidden problem—which will spread throughout the U.S.

Skyler Fike (bcWorkshop)

In America's Poorest City, a Housing Breakthrough

Together, a design studio and community-development corporation are transforming housing in the Rio Grande Valley.

LA2050

Young L.A. Is the Real Winner of LA2050

Youth initiatives dominate the winners of the My LA2050 Grants Challenge, even as L.A.'s child population wanes.

Sabina Ali

How an Oven Changed the Fate of a Neglected Toronto Park

Thorncliffe Park is now home to North America's first public tandoor oven, thanks to the efforts of local activists.

Vinogradov Illya/Shutterstock.com

Introducing 'City Makers: Global Stories'

Our new series about the people and ideas reshaping urban life all over the world, from the ground up.

Sean Davis / Flickr

The Memphis Airport Is on a Mission to Become Its Own City

But whether America's cargo capital can support a real urban center remains to be seen.

Lawrence Hurley

The Evolution of England's First Planned Community

In 1901, a team of social do-gooders teamed up to build a clean, green city. A look at their legacy, more than a century later