Anthony Flint

Anthony Flint

Ushering in an Era of Concrete Destruction

Cities spend big money to retrofit and modernize landscapes built with the world’s most popular construction material—even as others go right on pouring it.

Anthony Flint

The Hazardous Business of Celebrating Le Corbusier

The pioneer of modern architecture inspired hundreds of drab downtowns and suburban corporate office parks. But he had many good ideas that are relevant to citybuilding today

Flickr/vahanvaty/

As Asian Cities Grow, So Do Public Health Concerns

Smoking, junk food, and and alcohol use are wreaking havoc among poor migrants in Asian capitals.

Anthony Flint

Why Is Italy's 'National Mall' So Unwelcoming?

Caserta's La Reggia palace and grounds could bring new energy and a sense of ownership to citizens of a tourist destination—if only it wasn't so hard to get in.

Anthony Flint

Wait Your Turn for the Swings at Boston's Adult Playground

The wildly successful Lawn on D Street is a temporary park that took no tedious city planning. Should we let more urban design emerge organically?

Anthony Flint

When Neighborhood Re-Branding Celebrates What's Disappearing

"Branding" revamped neighborhoods for a barely past history can feel like a backhanded homage.

Anthony Flint

Beachfront in the Time of Climate Change

It's the end of the summer, but it's starting to feel like the end of an era. 

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Policy Development and Research/Wikimedia Commons

A Failed Public-Housing Project Could Be a Key to St. Louis' Future

The Pruitt-Igoe projects were razed in 1972, but their influence on Ferguson's social and financial divides echo today as redevelopment is planned. 

Serdar Tibet/Shutterstock.com

Braving the New World of Performance-Based Zoning

Conventional zoning is an outdated barrier against good urbanism, but there's disagreement on the best way forward.

Jacques PALUT/shutterstock.com

Restaurants Really Can Determine the Fate of Cities and Neighborhoods

A new survey shows how much food influences the vibrance of urban centers. 

Francisca Sumar, Stephen Mallon, Landgarden, Julienne Schaer

Who Really Owns Public Spaces?

A new exhibit at the AIA New York Center for Architecture examines the changing function of parks and other open urban centers.

Archive.org/Library of Congress

Olmsted the Hero, Moses the Villain

History views master planners Frederick Law Olmsted and Robert Moses very differently. 

Courtesy Robert A.M. Stern

Why the 'Garden City' Is Making an Unlikely Comeback

"Suburbs are like cholesterol," says Robert A.M. Stern — there's good and there's bad, all to be sensibly calibrated.

AP

What Millennials Want—And Why Cities Are Right to Pay Them So Much Attention

You might be sick of hearing about this generation, but two recent surveys show they can't, and shouldn't, be dismissed. 

Reuters

When Taking Back the City Means Returning to the Scene of the Crime

In the relentless Boston bombing anniversary coverage, the tagline on one local news channel is, "Let's Remember, Let's Run." Can we really do both?

AP

Is There a Medellín Hype Machine?

The city has been celebrated as an international model. Naturally, it's time for a backlash.

Michigan Municipal League

Why Andrés Duany Is So Focused on Making 'Lean Urbanism' a Thing

"Common sense has been almost completely lost in my profession," says the architect.

Shutterstock

The 'New Old' Way We Market American Real Estate

Technology has always influenced how we shop for, and buy, the places we live.

Utile Inc. Architecture + Planning

Why It Makes Sense for Long Island to Rethink the Parking Garage

A first step toward retrofitting the suburbs.