Eric Jaffe

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New York and Chicago's Century-Old Skyscraper Contest

The cities have been locked in battle since 1885, with no signs of stopping.

Reuters

The Billion-Dollar Technology That May or May Not Prevent the Next Big Train Crash

Positive Train Control is coming to a railroad near you — but perhaps not as soon as the government wants.

Reuters

Why Mega-Projects Always End Up Costing More Than Expected

And how the part-political, part-psychological problem can be avoided.

XpressWest

The Flawed Federal Rule That Killed High-Speed Rail to Vegas

It may be time to revisit the Buy America provision in U.S. transportation funding.

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Now We Can Actually Count and Track the 'Familiar Strangers' in Our Lives

That person you often see on the bus? Scientists are pinpointing exactly how often you're running into them.

National Archives

The Time the Teacher's Union Saved New York From Bankruptcy

In October 1975, only the whims of a union leader separated the city from default.

Reuters

Finally, a Plan to Pay for Public Transit With Highway Tolls

In Tampa, an innovative idea called "bus toll lanes" could pad the farebox with road revenue.

The Transit Project That New York Mayoral Candidates Should Be Talking About

The so-called "X line" subway route could carry some 76,000 riders a day through the outer boroughs.

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Distracted Walking Puts 1,500 People Into the Hospital a Year

Injuries to pedestrians on their cell phones have climbed steadily since 2005, according to a new study.

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How to Fund Transit Without Raising Fares or Cutting Service

Mark Aesch brings a private-sector mindset to public transportation — and so far it's working.

A Museum Show of Broken Umbrellas and Old Coffee Cups

A new exhibition transforms the "utterly ordinary" parts of New York City life into urban icons.

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The Rise of People Living Alone Has Led to More Sustainable Cities

Single households tend to use more transit and live in multi-family homes.

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The Unsettling Link Between Sprawl and Suicide

New research finds that as population density decreases, the suicide rate among young people goes up.

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When Urban Security Cameras Actually Save Lives

Taxi driver homicide rates are three times lower in cities with in-car cameras.

Reuters

No, Ride-Sharing Is Not the Death of Public Transportation

It helps cities cut car ownership, and it might even support a broader transit network.

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The Era of Pay-Per-Mile Driving Has Begun

Oregon just reinvented the gas tax.

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Is Civic Virtue Universal?

Not all cultures agree on what it means to be generous.

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Do We Really Need 'Sexy' Mass Transit Vehicles?

All else being equal, riders prefer good service to any particular mode.

Reuters

That's Right, Los Angeles Is Giving Up Car Lanes for Pedestrians

Six lanes of traffic will be reduced to three in the city's plan to improve the walkability of Broadway.