Eric Jaffe

Road Fees Don't Hurt the Poor as Much as You Might Think

They satisfy a "Do No Harm" approach to transportation planning, and they're less pernicious than sales tax measures.

Sure, Apple Maps Stinks, But Look at These Crazy Cool Dalí-Esque Scenes

Developer Peder Norrby collects iOS Maps glitches that have an accidental artistry.

The Case for Making Bike-Share Membership an Employee Benefit

An early wave of New York City companies is willing to foot the bill for workers who plan to commute with Citi Bike.

Cities Are Innovative Because They Contain More Ideas to Steal

Two economists argue urban environments help foster the borrowing of ideas even better than they harvest original ones.

This Month's Other Crucial Privacy Debate: The Rocky Future of Arrestee DNA Collection

Three arguments for, against, and qualifying the recent Supreme Court ruling.

'Transit' Might Not Be Essential to Transit-Oriented Development

A new study suggests rail proximity matters less than walkability, mixed-use development, and limited parking spots.

808 Cities, 2,503 Shows, and 1,007,416 Miles: The Staggering Geography of Bob Dylan's 'Never Ending Tour'

An interactive guide to all the cities and set lists over the past 25 years.

Your Street May Literally Be Paved With Gold (and Other Precious Metals)

Believe it or not, "urban mining" is an emerging academic interest.

Be Careful How You Refer to the So-Called 'Great American Streetcar Scandal'

The finer details of this urban legend deserve their own book.

Why We Shouldn't Rely on Smart Growth Incentives to Fix Sprawl

When it comes to development, local desires often render state smart growth incentives insufficient.

Does Being 'Sister Cities' Really Mean Anything?

As with actual siblings, there's no one way to define the relationship.

Do Bicycle Helmet Laws Really Make Riders Safer?

Typically, transportation laws promoting safety lead to an increase in public health. With bike helmet laws, the connection isn't so clear.

If a Photographer Takes a Picture of You Through Your Apartment Window, Is it Art?

A lawsuit against Arne Svenson, who captured unwitting subjects through their windows, could draw an important line between art and intrusion.

The Case for Caution When It Comes to Building Streetcars

There are several reasons to be excited about streetcars — and several others to be skeptical.

A Puzzling Relationship Between Same-Sex Parents and Gay Marriage?

Many of the highest percentages of gay couples raising children are found in states that ban gay marriage.

The Forgotten Urban Transportation Problem We Should Be Trying to Fix

Freight is crippling metro areas, but it's rarely part of city planning.

Photographic 'Love Letters' to New York and London

Daniella Zalcman blends images of the two cities in a way that's both fantastical and haunting.

How the Location of State Capitals Influences Political Corruption

Remote cities are especially vulnerable to scandal, according to a new study.

A Quest to Save New York City's Disappearing Diners

Preservationist Michael Perlman, who calls diners "cornerstones of Americana," has a unique niche.