Gillian B. White

Paul Sancya/AP

The Steady Deconstruction of America's Cities

Peter Moskowitz’s new book on gentrification outlines how local governments cede their power over residents’ lives to private interests.

Library of Congress

In D.C., White Families Are on Average 81 Times Richer Than Black Ones

Other major cities aren’t much better.

Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Black Wealth in the Age of Trump

The president-elect has pledged tax reform and job creation—policies that should theoretically help poor and minority Americans. Will they?

Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Will D.C.'s Housing Ever Be Affordable Again?

Over the next decade, the city’s demographics will change dramatically, and housing policy will largely determine who gets to stay.

Lucas Jackson / Reuters

How Can the Hospitals That Serve D.C.'s Poor Keep Up?

Even in a city with some of the best health-insurance coverage rates and a glut of medical facilities, residents just a few miles apart are projected to have vastly different lifespans.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Why Should Only the Wealthy Get Solar Panels?

Washington, D.C., has embarked on an aggressive clean-energy plan, but a big challenge will be making sure it doesn't worsen existing inequalities.

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

When Poverty Is Profitable

A new book details how foster-care agencies and other safety-net programs hire consultants to maximize their funding and divert it from its intended use.

Rick Wilking / Reuters

How Tax-Prep Services Prey on the Poor

Big-name tax-preparation companies charge low-income customers big bucks to file for refunds that are simple to do without help.

Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Is There a Better Way to Think About Income Inequality?

One sociologist says that there’s too much of a focus on giving out more college degrees, getting more people married, and making elite workplaces more diverse.

James Willamor / Flickr

The Downside of Durham's Rebirth

The city carefully planned its economic revitalization. Why, then, is it so painful for some of the people who have lived here the longest?

Reuters/Steve Dipaola

Why Blacks and Hispanics Have Such Expensive Mortgages

High-cost lenders are targeting these communities, preventing them from building wealth to pass on to their children.

Eric Gay / AP Photo

The Housing Crisis for Americans With Disabilities

For millions of renters with limited mobility and other physical challenges, there are few homes and apartments on the market that work for them.

Jeff Chiu / REUTERS

When Will Labor Laws Catch Up With the Gig Economy?

Companies such as Uber will get regulated eventually—but whether that's the best way to help on-demand workers is still being debated.

Eric Risberg / Reuters

How Zoning Laws Exacerbate Inequality

Such laws aren’t just a headache for developers, economists believe. They’re bad for (nearly) everyone.

REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Should Computers Decide Who Gets Hired?

When it comes to reviewing job applications, humans are relatively bad at selecting the best humans.

Paul Joseph / Flickr

Being White Makes It a Lot Easier to Get a Home Loan in Baltimore

That's a problem in a city where 63 percent of residents are black.

Don Ryan / AP

Are Hispanic Immigrants Finding a Better Life in the U.S.?

Compared to other immigrant groups? No. Compared to their parents? Yes.

Jon Feinstein / Flickr

There Are Plenty of New Apartments Being Built—Just Not Affordable Ones

A surplus of swanky residences means wealthier renters aren't seeing the huge price increases that poorer ones are.