Kriston Capps

It's Time to Bring Back the Old Super Bowl City Logos

For decades, the NFL favored designs celebrating the game's host cities over the boring logos we're stuck with today.

Mapping the Crushing Truth About Your Work Commute

Many people in the U.S. carpool, walk, and use public transit to get to work—but most are still hacking traffic in a car, all alone.

Steven Holl Architects

Can a Massive Museum Expansion Get Texans Walking?

What sets the expansion of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, apart is one of its secondary goals: to make the Museum District a real, walkable neighborhood.

Pool/Reuters

Poll: Spending on Infrastructure Is a Top Priority for Americans

Democrats and Republicans are at an impasse on infrastructure funding, but a majority of Americans support new spending on such investment.  

Maureen Still/Flickr

Minorities and the 'Slumburbs'

Despite bleak forecasts, families of color are finding more equitable conditions in suburbs. But the type of suburb matters.

Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Poll: Police Are Still Incredibly Popular

Even after widespread protests over police brutality and racial profiling, a majority of the public thinks cops are doing well "protecting the safety and rights of minorities."

Charles Platiau/Reuters

Can Architecture Unite a Divided Paris?

The curtain finally rises at the long-awaited, Jean Nouvel-designed venue—unfinished and with its architect protesting on opening night. Can it still fulfill high hopes?

Metro Vancouver

Every City Needs Vancouver's Ban on Food Scraps

To kick off 2015, Vancouver has resolved to eliminate food products from its waste stream entirely.

Kondor83/Shutterstock.com

What $14 Cocktails Say About Neighborhood Housing Prices

Retail prices rise as a direct result of surges in home prices—the same reasons that bar prices do: Wealthier people don't mind.

Adam Dachis/Flickr

Portland's Messy Breakup With Its Airport Carpet

Is it turquoise? Is it teal? Whichever it is, Portlanders have strong feelings about PDX's beloved—and soon-to-go—carpet.

Michael Dwyer/AP

Beantown Responds to #Boston2024

One Twitter user's suggested Olympics motto: "Fastah, Highah, Wicked Strong."

Brian Snyder/Reuters

How Boston Won the U.S. Bid for the 2024 Olympic Games

The city has colleges as infrastructure and hosts a huge sporting event every year. The Big Dig may have even worked in its favor.

Cynthia Connolly

An Artist Finds a Little Bit of Los Angeles Everywhere

Photographer Cynthia Connolly captures the faded glamor of the city's rooftop signage—even in Virginia, New York, and D.C.

Tim Brown/Flickr

Why D.C. Better Hope It Wins the U.S. Olympic Bid

The city is already sticking itself with the worst downsides of hosting the games. At least this way, it would be forced to make crucial improvements.

Derick E. Hingle/USA Today Sports/Reuters

Ohio City Changes Name Because... Sports

As the Ohio State Buckeyes prepare for a championship game against the Oregon Ducks, the city of Oregon, Ohio, gets a ridiculous new name.

D.C. Taxicab Commission

Which Is More Evil: Uber or D.C.'s Old Taxi Zone System?

Uber may not be an ideal ride-hailing solution. But let's remember the unpredictable, shifty days of Washington's unmetered cabs.

meryddian/Flickr

No More Winter 'Dibs' on Parking Spots

In Boston's South End, a debate over post-snow parking rights shows that no one should "own" any part of public streets.

Richard Meier & Partners/Snøhetta

San Francisco Loves to Hate the Design of Its Newest Tower

Snøhetta's designs for One Van Ness have already inspired a number of photoshopped parodies.

Michael Kooren/Reuters

A 'Pollen Bomb' Drops on Texas Cities

Colder winter-weather spells bring more severe allergens to the cities that already suffer the most.