Kriston Capps

Gensler

Now Houston Is Considering Replacing the Astrodome With a Smaller Astrodome

A new plan to replace the Astrodome with an Astrodome Hall of Fame calls into question whether anyone actually wants to demolish the Astrodome.

Tim Evanson/Flickr

America's Booming Pay-to-Stay Visa Program Still Has Tons of Room to Grow

A once-obscure program that provides permanent resident status in exchange for foreign investment in troubled places is starting to pay dividends in some U.S. cities.

Yildiray Cinar/Marvel

Iron Man Should Move to Cleveland, Not San Francisco

The Armored Avenger is moving to the Bay Area in an upcoming comic series, but he could do more for the people of Northeast Ohio.

Carlos Barria/Reuters

Black Homeowners Are Worse Off Today Than They Were 40 Years Ago

A new study finds that African Americans are dramatically more likely to transition back to renter status than whites.

Project Connect

Austin's Rail-or-Fail Vote Is Uniting Transit Supporters and Foes

Facing down a determined opposition, Austin is wise to plan for growth with its new rail project—even if that means investing in areas where demand is only starting to arrive.

Courtesy the Government of the State of Ceará

Why the U.S. Is Building a Fantastical Aquarium in Brazil

An exotic new aquarium under construction in Brazil is a lightning rod on two continents—and the latest test of the theory that where weird designs go, new cities follow.

The Brooklyn Bridge Has Always Been a Magnet for Mystery

First a grand piano showed up underneath it, then two white flags appeared on top of it. Why does the Brooklyn Bridge attract so many enigmas?

Rebecca Cook/Reuters

A New Site Allows You to Pay a Detroit Resident's Water Bill

Turn On Detroit's Water matches donors with Detroiters who are under water on their water bills.

Marquisphoto/Shutterstock.com

What's Behind the Backlash to Houston's 'One Bin for All' Program

The city is forging ahead with an unprecedented single-bin combined waste collection and recycling plan. But it may want to reconsider ditching tried-and-true methods.

D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities

D.C. Sinks an Artist's Plan to Build a Sunken Gas Station in the Anacostia River

A proposal by Canadian artist Mia Feuer to build a replica of a submerged gas station in the Anacostia has finally found what any good public art project needs: a vocal opposition.

Sean Gardner/Reuters

New Orleans Transit Never Recovered After Katrina

New Orleans' population has rebounded since the devastating 2005 hurricane, but public transportation is still a mess—especially for the poor.

California State Mining Bureau/Flickr

Six Californias, One Super City-State

One venture capitalist's dream to divide California into six states—while consolidating much of its power into one.

Jim Young/Reuters

The Little-Studied Link Between 'Murder Capitals' and Population Decline

Cities with high homicide rates share a major demographic trait. But we don't know nearly enough about how it works. 

Kriston Capps

Six Guesses About Those Car2Go Black Cards

Feeling entitled by your new car2go black card? That's only one of the hypothetical benefits.

Adam Hunger/Reuters

How Much Does Northeast Ohio Need LeBron?

LeBron James thinks he can boost the fortunes of Northeast Ohio by returning to the Cleveland Cavaliers. The area could use some help.

REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Detroit Still Shouldn't Sell Its Art

Auctioning off Detroit's art collection would reduce the city's debt, not its suffering. Residents shouldn't go for it, even as the price climbs.

Kriston Capps

The Nerd Garage of Your Dreams

With state-of-the-art equipment and courses on 3-D printing and personal prototyping, TechShops could change the face of manufacturing. 

Why Every City Needs a Labyrinth

The architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group built a giant maze in Washington, D.C. Cities everywhere should get one.

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington

D.C.'s Fanciest Micro-Housing Project Is Meant for Millennials

The Patterson House, a historic mansion in the District of Columbia, is being converted into very small units for young one-percenters.