Laura Bliss

Janet Delaney

Photographing the Beginning of the End of 'Old San Francisco'

Janet Delaney's "South of Market" series documents an early wave of the city's transformation—in the 1970s.

Ri Liu

Visualizing the Global Gender Gap

A new visualization charts the great lengths countries must go to achieve gender equality.

Flickr/wonderlane

Who Are the Tiny People in Architectural Renderings?: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

REUTERS/Keith Bedford

Assault on the Subway: What Can a Bystander Do?

There are ways to intervene that don't involve putting yourself in danger.

AP Photo/California High Speed Rail Authority

Another Reason to Love California High-Speed Rail: It's Drought-Friendly

Despite what critics say, the project will encourage higher-density growth—and save precious water over the long term.

Michael Pecirno

Cornfields, Trees, and Water: Mapping the Rest of America

Most maps of the U.S. prioritize metropolitan areas. But "Minimal Maps" single out the nation's forests, crops, and waterbodies.

REUTERS/Jon Nazca

A New Frontier in Disease Prevention: Lightbulbs

Artificial light can attract insects carrying deadly pathogens—a big concern in developing nations. Can customized LEDs help?

REUTERS/Eric Thayer

A Hidden Consequence of California's Drought: It's Making Energy Dirtier

With little water in the state's reservoirs, hydroelectricity is losing ground to natural gas—and there's a big price to pay.

The Geological Society

The First-Ever Geologic Map of a Nation Was Just Rediscovered in London

William Smith's kaleidoscopic 1815 geologic map of England was the bedrock of many modern land-based industries.

BIG

The Future of Town Halls Looks Kind of Like the Past: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Evan Tachovsky

Mapping the Lasting Effects of Redlining

Old federal maps and recent Census data combine to show how today's poverty rates align with racist 1930s mortgaging policies.

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Why Banning Fast Food in South L.A. Hasn't Helped Reduce Obesity

There are many forces that promote healthier eating, but a zoning regulation against fast-food restaurants has not turned out to be one.

Mapbox via USGS and OpenStreetMap

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

It's always summer on Google Earth. But a landmark Mapbox project uses satellite imagery to show the planet as it is now.

Flickr/bluesbby

A San Francisco Church Is Drenching the Homeless to Keep Them Away

So much for "advancing human dignity."

REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

A Silver Lining to 2015's Horrible Weather: It Made Us Better Tippers

Our winter delivery tip habits revealed.

Flickr/wikileakstruck, Wikimedia Commons/Paethon, Laura Bliss

The 'Oculus Rift' and the Courtroom

Immersive virtual reality could shake up jurors and judges across the globe.

Mario Tama/Getty Images News

The Travesty of Transit in Brazil's Megacity: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

BRIC

Brooklyn, All Over the Maps

A new exhibition explores the borough's complexities by juxtaposing new artworks and historic maps.

Santa Clarita Valley Historical Society

The Politics of Disaster at Los Angeles' St. Francis Dam

In 1928, more than 400 people were killed in a massive dam break in L.A. County—and the tragedy is barely recognized. That might finally be changing.