Laura Bliss

Michael Pederson

A Sydney Artist's Playful Street Signs Interrupt the Mundane

"I would like the viewer to reorient themselves and think about the space they inhabit with others," says Michael Pederson.

Flickr/JDHancock

The Year in Bigfoot

Two states led the nation in Sasquatch sightings, which have been on the decline since surging in the '00s.

Parable of the Polygons

An Immersive Game Shows How Easily Segregation Arises—and How We Might Fix It

"Parable of the Polygons" is playable version of Thomas Schelling's model of neighborhood segregation, with an optimistic ending.

Reuters/Gene Blevins

Was Monday's Fire in Downtown L.A. an 'Architectural Hate Crime'?

The destroyed building was to be the latest mega-complex by a detested local developer.

Flickr/bikeman04

Could Your Local Bike Shop Serve Women Better?

It definitely could. And a survey from Women Bike hopes to discern best practices for attracting and retaining female customers.

Kim Stringfellow

The Last Homesteads of Wonder Valley, California

Remnants of a final wave of federal land grants, hundreds of 1950s "jackrabbit homesteads" still haunt a distant corner of the Mojave desert.

Vintage Visualizations

The Modern Beauty of 19th-Century Data Visualizations

These high-quality poster reproductions from an 1870s statistical atlas are at once gorgeously designed and utterly antiquated.

Road sign, “East 66 / West 66,” Williams, Arizona, circa 1970s. (Collection of Steve Rider)

The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66

For a brief time in American tourism, travel was about the journey. Here's how it came to be about the destination.

Am I In Las Vegas?

An Interactive Map Shows Leaving Las Vegas Is Easier Than You Think

It also helps residents of Vegas' many unincorporated communities determine whether they're covered by city services.

AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Predicting Travel Patterns in Future Disasters

Researchers hope mobility data gleaned from Twitter during Hurricane Sandy can eventually help boost New York City's resilience.

Youtube/E . Stephanian

Lewis Baltz, Famed Photographer of Post-War Sprawl, Dies at 69

"I tried to show myself as an anthropologist from a different solar system. What kind of new world was being built here?"

AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

The World's First Marijuana Credit Union Will Open in January

Thanks to an overlooked law, Colorado's legal pot enterprises will finally get the legitimate banking services they need. But discord with the feds still casts a shadow over the industry.

Flickr/Tabsinthe

How to Make a Better Map—Using Neuroscience

These three cartographers are applying advances in brain science and cognitive psychology to their work.

Victoria Lautman

Can India's Ancient Stepwells Help Solve the Country's Water Crisis?

Now largely obsolete, these Escher-like cisterns were once monuments of public life. And in the midst of water shortage, stepwells may refill their civic role.

Freedom/YouTube

Sorry Photo Drones, These Real Bird's-Eye City Views Rule Way Harder

To mark the 50th anniversary of the "Red List" of endangered species, a white-tailed eagle with a GoPro captured swooping views of London.

Expanding a Kid's Ideas About 'Home'

Four households around the world reveal unique yet familiar domestic experiences in an immersive new app.

Facebook/Modesto Art Museum

Uncovering a Lost Design Legacy in a City Starved For Art

Modesto, California, was once ranked the nation's least livable city. That spurred one man to uncover its forgotten contributions to 20th-century architectural history.

PLOS One

Why 'Six Degrees of Separation' Breaks Down Inside Cities

Inspired by Milgram's famous experiment, an analysis of Twitter networks and geography reveals how personal connections get lost at the city level.

Flickr/albedo20

It May Be Possible to Actually Live in an IKEA

Twelve-year-old Peng Yijian holed up in Shanghai mega-stores for six days, reportedly living off free food samples.