Richard Florida

Andrey Zudilin/Shutterstock.com

Baby Boomers Were Job-Hopping Before It Was Cool

New data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the notion of the "company man" died not recently, but long ago.

Wikimedia Commons/BrokenSphere

Where Millennials Are Moving Now

New Census data shows that migration patterns among young adults changed after the Great Recession.

Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Where LGBTQ Americans Live

New polling from Gallup tells a tale of growing tolerance.

Flickr/David

Inequality Keeps Creeping Higher in America's Largest Cities

A new analysis finds that the largest cities in the U.S. are also some of its most unequal, now more than ever.

Flickr/Images Money

The U.S. Cities Where It Takes the Longest to Be Able to Afford to Buy a Home

Metro areas in California look especially bleak in this analysis.

Flickr/Tristram Brelstaff

Why Some U.K. Cities Thrive While Others Decline

An intriguing new report looks at long-term economic trends in metros across Britain.

Flickr/Klovovi

Mapping the Global Super-Rich

The favored locales of the 0.002 percent.

Flickr/Susan Sermoneta

How Gentrifiers Change the Definition of a Neighborhood

New research out of Philadelphia finds race to be the biggest predictor of how residents defined their changing communities.    

Reuters/Lucas Jackson

Sorry, London: New York Is the World's Most Economically Powerful City

Our new ranking puts the Big Apple firmly on top.

Shutterstock

A Painstaking New Study Reveals the Persistence of U.S. Racial Segregation

Racial segregation doubled between 1880 and 1940 all across the country, in rural areas as well as cities.

MPI

America's Most Economically Segregated Cities

Can you guess what Tallahassee, Trenton, and Tucson all have in common?

Reuters/Kevork Djansezian

The Geography of Box Office Success

In honor of the Oscars, we tried mapping where 2014's biggest movies were set and shot. What we learned surprised us.

Flickr/Ron Reiring

A New Index to Measure Sprawl Gives High Marks to Los Angeles

L.A. is the least sprawling metro area in the country, according to this analysis, besting New York and San Francisco.

Martin Prosperity Institute

Where There Are More Single Men Than Women

Almost everywhere, actually—at least up until a certain age.

Jo Ann Snover / Shutterstock.com

What Makes a Dense Urban County Vote Republican?

The biggest U.S. cities are still Democratic strongholds, but new research sheds light on why some of them aren't.

Flickr/Andréa Portilla

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.

Reuters/Jeff Tuttle

Advanced Industries Still Rule the U.S. Economy—But It's an Advantage That's Slipping

These high-tech sectors are also more geographically concentrated than they were a decade ago.

Reuters/Shaun Best

Never Host a Mega-Event?

In his newest book, sports economist Andrew Zimbalist explores how the Olympics, the World Cup and, yes, the Super Bowl became such bad deals for cities.

American Spirit / Shutterstock.com

The Striking Decline in African-American Household Mobility

Over the course of the last century, black Americans went from being one of the groups most likely to move to one of the least.