Richard Florida

The Role of Public Investment in Gentrification

Neighborhoods don't transform only because rich people suddenly decide to move there.

Brain Gain in the Rustbelt

Cities like Pittsburgh and Detroit are attracting more highly educated people.

The Geography of Pop Music Superstars

Three cities have dominated over time: New York, London, and L.A.

Private Conflict, Not Broken Windows

Why community policing should focus on helping to resolve personal and domestic disputes, not signs of physical decay.

America's Most Expensive Neighborhoods for Renters

We’re looking at you, New York, San Francisco, and L.A.

America's Ongoing Love Affair With the Car

Despite modest improvements in dense city centers, the vast majority of us are still driving to work alone.

The Geography of America's Beer Preferences, According to Twitter

A new interactive map charts how beer choice varies by where we live.

America's Biggest Problem Is Concentrated Poverty, Not Inequality

Addressing income inequality is important, but worsening economic segregation has far more compounding effects.

Does Living in a Global City Make You More Globally Aware?

A new study examines Twitter data to find out.

The Distinct Personality of Entrepreneurial Cities

Great universities, venture capital, and talented people are necessary, but insufficient.

Resetting and Reimagining New York City's Economy

The city came roaring back after the recession, but its divides also deepened.

The World’s Leading Startup Cities

Challengers to Silicon Valley include New York, L.A., Boston, Tel Aviv, and London.

Mass Transit Doesn't Cause Gentrification

A new study of New York City finds that incomes do go up with subway access, but there are other crucial factors at play.

Where and Why Walking or Biking to Work Makes a Difference

An active commute matters, wherever you live.

What Can You Buy for the Price of One SoHo Apartment?

Sixty-eight homes, in some Detroit neighborhoods.

Mapping the Connections Between Cities, Inequality, and Creative Economies

Some of the world’s most powerful creative economies are doing economic development wrong. It doesn’t need to be that way.

How Much Are You Willing to Pay to Live in America’s Best Neighborhoods?

A new, expansive index measures and maps the quality of life for 2,000 U.S. neighborhoods.

A Global Geography of Peace (and Violence)

Will rapid urbanization in developing nations make their cities more violent?

Mapping Where American Workers Spend the Most on Housing

It would take service workers in San Jose 20 years to save up for a home.