Richard Florida

Why People Stay Where They Are

We hear a lot about why people leave their communities—but only about one in ten Americans moves per year.

What Makes Us the Happiest About the Places We Live

Urbanites and suburbanites in the U.S. have a lot more in common than you might have guessed.

Houston and San Jose Are Leading U.S. Economic Growth

The continued rise of America's new knowledge-energy economy.

Singles Now Make Up More Than Half the U.S. Adult Population. Here's Where They All Live

The new geography of our "solo nation."

The Rise of Real Estate Tech

Another feather in New York’s cap: It's home to the nascent high-tech real estate industry.

However Useless, Economic Development Incentives Are on the Rise

Nevada’s Gigafactory deal is just the latest of the roughly $70 billion in incentives governments have given companies since the mid-1970s.

Reno Won Tesla's Gigafactory. Was It Worth It?

It's the 10th largest incentive deal ever, with Nevada paying nearly $200,000 per job.

The Increasingly Bloated American Dream

American homes are getting bigger and bigger. But it doesn't need to be that way. 

The Best Job Markets for Young College Grads Now

The U.S. economy added 2.2 million jobs that require post-secondary education between 2010 and 2014. Here's how they shake out.

The Roller-Coaster Economies of Vacation Towns

The end of summer is nearly here. Which U.S. cities are about to radically change?

Where More Americans Die at the Hands of Police

Missouri looks like it's in the middle of the pack. But we desperately need better data. 

Mapping America's New Economy in Construction Permits

The Boston-Washington corridor is up; the Rustbelt and Sunbelt are down.

America's Wage Gap Just Keeps Getting Worse

Since the recession, low-income households have turned into low-income regions.

There's a Remarkably Strong Link Between Community Service and Happiness

A new study shows a big difference between those who serve their communities and those who don't. 

Why Mayors Need a UN-Like Organization of Their Own

The world’s mayors are running the biggest and most important cities in all of human history. They need to have a forum.

Gentrification and the Persistence of Poor Minority Neighborhoods

A new study finds that neighborhoods that are more than 40 percent black are far less likely to gentrify.

Where the Great Recession Made Inequality Worse

The most dramatic increases were not in the usual places. 

The Troubling Decline of American Business Dynamism

Despite the startup buzz, the U.S. is far less entrepreneurial than it was a decade ago. 

The New Geography of U.S. Consumer Debt

Why a small city like McAllen, Texas, has less total debt than Silicon Valley, but is still in worse shape.