Richard Florida

America's Leading Design Cities

New York and L.A. aren't the only epicenters for graphic designers, architects, and fashion designers. 

ZIP Codes of the Super Rich

Ten percent of ZIP codes in the San Jose metro have median home values of more than $2 million.

America's Looming Rental Crisis

After the housing-market crash, droves of people want to rent. But construction of new units hasn't kept up with demand.

Tax Rates Aren't What Small Business Owners Say They Really Care About

Instead, they care more about how easy it is to keep up with rules, regulations, and tax filings. 

Where Cities Are Growing Faster Than Their Suburbs

In 19 of the 51 largest U.S. metros, including knowledge centers like New York, the city grew faster than the suburbs last year.

Are Baby Boomers Really Keeping Millennials From Finding Jobs?

As more put off retirement, the number of older workers grew 9 percent since 2007.

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

The Mixed-Up Geographic Allegiances of World Cup Soccer

Nearly three-quarters of all World Cup players play in European professional leagues.

Why Democrats Are Focused on Inequality: Liberal Metros Face the Worst of It

U.S. metro areas that voted for Obama tend to have higher levels of inequality and segregation.

The Economic Data Hidden in Nighttime Views of City Lights

Getting satellite luminosity data right could help us better understand what works and what doesn't in urban development.

How Heavy Metal Tracks the Wealth of Nations

This music of disillusion and despair is, strangely, biggest in countries with very high quality of life. 

Americans Like Living in States With Less Income Inequality

Residents of Alaska, Utah, and Wyoming say their states—which boast the lowest levels of income inequality in the country—are great places to live. 

The Overwhelming Persistence of Neighborhood Poverty

For all the debate, gentrification is far from the norm.

The Uneven U.S. Jobs Recovery Is Even Clearer When Tracked Per Capita

California added 900,000 new jobs during the recovery, but they were spread over the state's 38 million residents.

Mapping Three Decades of Rising Income Inequality, State by State

U.S. income inequality increased 15 percent between 1979 and 2012, but the story varies across different parts of the country.

Gay Men Living in 'Gayborhoods' Travel Shorter Distances Than the Average Person

A new study tracks the link between living in "neighborhoods of affinity" and urban mobility.

The Rate of New Business Formation Has Fallen By Almost Half Since 1978

America's declining "business dynamism" has affected all 50 states and nearly every single metro area.

The U.S. Cities Where Creative Class Workers Are Most Segregated From Everyone Else

Those who work in different types of jobs tend to live apart in places like L.A., San Francisco and Texas's largest metros.

Why Americans Are Moving Less: New Jobs Aren't Worth It

The financial benefit of moving for a new job has been cut nearly in half over the past few decades.