Sarah Goodyear

Courtesy of Catherine McNeur

When Gentrification Meant Driving the Hogs Out of Manhattan

In 19th-century New York, urban livestock were perceived as a threat to the image and future of the nation's largest city.

Sarah Goodyear

In Miami, a Street Artist Dies at the Hands of Police

During Art Basel, a tagger called Demz was run down by police protecting street-art fans from street artists. His death has more than one connection to Eric Garner's.

Songquan Deng

Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City

A New York City Council member wants the lights off at night in 40,000 commercial buildings to save the environment. Would this dim the city's iconic skyline?

New York City Department of Records

Life Inside the Drunk, Rowdy World of New Amsterdam

A collection of newly digitized ordinances from the 17th-century settlement that would become New York City reveals a riotous city full of crime, trash, and “insolent practices with sad accidents of bodily injury.”

Flickr Creative Commons

The Secret History of Cars Begins With Bicycles

Politically powerful 19th-century cyclists created road infrastructure in the U.S. and Europe—and many of them went on to lead the fledgling automobile industry.

connel / Shutterstock.com

The Swedish Approach to Road Safety: 'The Accident Is Not the Major Problem'

Sweden's top traffic safety strategist visits New York to share lessons from the original "Vision Zero."

REUTERS/Aly Song

Declining Walkability Plays a Big Role in China's Obesity Problem

But it's the middle class, not the poor who may pay the biggest price.  

StacieStauffSmith Photos/Shutterstock.com

Will New Yorkers Warm Up to a New 25-Mile-Per-Hour Speed Limit?

As NYC makes serious changes to reduce pedestrian traffic deaths, some New Yorkers resist out of romance for the city's chaotic streets.

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New York's Citi Bike Announces Major Changes

Prices will go up for the hugely popular bike-share service, but infrastructure will see a big overhaul in return.

@stlouis_j

In Protests, Who Owns the Highways?

Whose streets? Our streets. But more than rush hour is disrupted when people take to the highways.

Megan/Flickr Creative Commons

What If the Last Bookstore Closes?

A fight to keep a Barnes & Noble alive in the Bronx points to the necessity of real bookstores—and to the struggle for the borough to get one in the first place.

joyfull/Shutterstock.com

What We Can Learn from a Dutch Bike Traffic Jam

Even in the cycling utopia of the Netherlands, bicyclists face infrastructure problems.

8th.creator/Shutterstock.com

Would You Take the 'Walk to Get Your Groceries' Challenge?

Strong Towns wants to change the way Americans see the places they live—such as what a walk to the store reveals about infrastructure.

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Banning Cars From Central Park: Has the Time Finally Come?

New Yorkers have been fighting over this for decades. But a new proposal to study a full ban next summer would bring some sorely needed hard data to the debate.

Rikard Stadler/ Shutterstock.com

When Harassment of Bicyclists and Pedestrians Is a Crime

Kansas City, Missouri, is the latest city to pass legislation prohibiting drivers from "intimidating or injuring" walkers and bikers.

GUIDENOP / Shutterstock.com

The Rate of Pedestrians Injured by Bicyclists Is Going Down

After recent high-profile deaths in NYC, the good news is that such accidents are becoming rarer—at least in New York and California.

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The Ugly Economics of Subprime Auto Loans

For many Americans, having a car means keeping a job in transit-barren suburbs and cities. Losing transportation could mean losing everything.

Rockefeller Foundation

How to Help the World's Cities Prepare for the Next Disaster

A conversation with 100 Resilient Cities president Michael Berkowitz.

Allen.G / Shutterstock.com

A Death in Central Park Raises Real Questions About Bicyclist Behavior

It was the second fatal bike-pedestrian crash in the city in just two months.