Videos

'Taking Back the Town From the Automobile'

A clever idea for reclaiming the suburbs from endless driving.

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Courtesy: Wheel Change

WheelChange, an advocate for new, smart multi-modal transportation systems, asserts that a more sustainable future of personal transportation could be based on communications technology, smaller vehicles, and sharing. On their website, they write:

By enabling a diverse set of existing and new transportation options to work together to allow an individual access to their city, one could think of this smart multi-mobility future as being a set of stepping stones across a river, while the conventional car ownership model is more like the large and heavy bridge.

It is the brainchild of Dan Sturges, a Colorado-based transportation designer and entrepreneur.

The video below, produced by Sturges, is a very clever and fun animation of how such a system could be deployed as a tool in reforming sprawl into smarter, walkable communities.  Enjoy!

New Wheels for Joe from Dan Sturges on Vimeo.

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog.

About the Author

  • Kaid Benfield is the director of the Sustainable Communities and Smart Growth program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, co-founder of the LEED for Neighborhood Development rating system, and co-founder of Smart Growth America. More
    Kaid Benfield is the director of the Sustainable Communities and Smart Growth program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, co-founder of the LEED for Neighborhood Development rating system, and co-founder of Smart Growth America. He is the author or co-author of Once There Were Greenfields (NRDC 1999), Solving Sprawl (Island Press 2001), Smart Growth In a Changing World (APA Planners Press 2007), and Green Community (APA Planners Press 2009). In 2009, Kaid was voted one of the "top urban thinkers" on Planetizen.com, and he was named one of "the most influential people in sustainable planning and development" in 2010 by the Partnership for Sustainable Communities. He blogs at NRDC's Switchboard.