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Brazilian Protesters Say Their Mass Transit Systems Are a Mess. Here's What That Looks Like

A day in the life of Brazil's subway and bus commuters.

Protests continue across Brazil, with demonstrations scheduled in at least 12 different cities this evening. Demonstrators in Belo Horizonte blocked roads and set a bus ablaze earlier today, and authorities say they expect more than 60,000 to turn up for a Confederations Cup match this evening.

The demonstrations continue to be fueled by a wide variety of demands ranging from government corruption to basic public services. But perhaps nothing exemplifies the current national frustration more than Brazil's public transit systems. It was a series of proposed bus fare increases, after all, that kicked off the current wave of protests to begin with. Protesters in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro in particular complain their bus and subway systems that are often overcrowded and increasingly expensive.

So what exactly are the mass transit conditions in Brazil's largest cities? Below, via Reuters, an up-close and personal look at the country's everyday commutes.

Commuters wait for the train at a subway station in downtown Sao Paulo May 28, 2013. The metropolitan area of some 20 million people has only about 45 miles (72 km) of mostly underground rail. Sao Paulo has some of the world's worst traffic jams, with commuters sometimes needing three hours to travel about nine miles (14 km) across Brazil's biggest city and financial capital. Picture taken May 28, 2013. (REUTERS/Nacho Doce)
People travel on a public bus in a street at Recife city, June 21, 2013. Demonstrators in Brazil gathered this week to continue the growing protest that is tapping into widespread anger at poor public services. They are demanding for better access to health, education and transport. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado)
People travel on a public bus through a street in downtown Belo Horizonte June 25, 2013. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
People travel on a public bus through a street in downtown Belo Horizonte June 25, 2013. Demonstrators in Brazil gathered this week to continue the growing protest that is tapping into widespread anger at poor public services, mainly health, education and transport. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
A public bus makes its way through a street in downtown Belo Horizonte June 25, 2013. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
People line up to pass through the main gate of a bus station in Recife June 21, 2013.  (REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci)
People try to get in as others try to exit a bus at a bus station in Recife City June 21, 2013. (REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes)
People are seen inside a public bus in Recife City June 21, 2013.  (REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes)
A woman arrives a bus station to board a public bus at Recife city, June 21, 2013. (REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado)
People stand inside a public bus passing by Maracana stadium, one of the venues hosting the upcoming Confederations Cup, during rush hour in Rio de Janeiro June 7, 2013. All but diehard fans of international soccer could be forgiven for not knowing, much less caring, about the Confederations Cup, a two-week tournament that kicks off in Brazil on Saturday. For 200 million Brazilians, though, the competition is the first in a series of big events that will say a lot about their country, their first-world ambitions and the government's ability, amid fading confidence in Latin America's biggest economy, to deliver on the promise of a Brazil transformed. Picture taken June 7, 2013. (REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes)
A commuter waits with her suitcase for an available train at a subway station in downtown Sao Paulo May 29, 2013. The metropolitan area of some 20 million people has only about 45 miles (72 km) of mostly underground rail. Sao Paulo has some of the world's worst traffic jams, with commuters sometimes needing three hours to travel about nine miles (14 km) across Brazil's biggest city and financial capital. Picture taken May 29, 2013. (REUTERS/Nacho Doce)
A commuter tries closing the door of a crowded train at a subway station in downtown Sao Paulo May 28, 2013.  (REUTERS/Nacho Doce)
A commuter looks at a map of train routes at a subway station in downtown Sao Paulo May 29, 2013.  (REUTERS/Nacho Doce)
Commuters wait for the train at a subway station in downtown Sao Paulo May 28, 2013. (REUTERS/Nacho Doce)
A protester jumps over a subway turnstile during a protest demanding improvements be made to the public transport system, at the bus station in the centre of Brasilia June 19, 2013. This month's transport fare hikes, which came as Brazil struggles with annual inflation of 6.5 percent, stirred a groundswell of other complaints, leading to the biggest protests to sweep Brazil in more than two decades. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)

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