Crime

CityFixer

The Next Generation of Complete Streets Is Unfolding in New Haven

The city's new approach puts an emphasis on fast, cheap, and lean designs.

The Science of Road Rage

Psychologists still don't fully understand driving-related violence. But technology and improved transit infrastructure offer solutions to minimize it.

Maps

More Cities Should Make Mythbusting Maps Like This

An interactive map takes down D.C.'s urban legends. Expanded, it could offer a hyperlocal look at the lore of cities across the country.

Who Should See Recordings From Police Bodycams?

The dilemma with letting cops choose what to turn over—or releasing everything they see.

Here Are the Tools to Hack into Your City's Public Advertising

But you probably shouldn't do that, says the artist making them.

Adventure Climbers Conquer Hong Kong's Sky-High Towers

The result: footage so arresting it should be prescribed as a diuretic.

Are Mobile Crime Alerts Making You Racist?

Citizens want details on crime in their neighborhoods, and law enforcement agencies are giving it to them. But there is such a thing as too much information.

Seattle Tries Shaming Its Citizens Into Participating in Composting

The city's "scarlet letter" system joins a long line of policies designed to embarrass. But do they work?

The Sorry State of 'Good Samaritan' Laws

Whether you can safely help a stranger during a crisis largely depends on where you live.

White Privilege, on a Bicycle

The perils of "biking while black" came into sharp focus this month.

Poll: Police Are Still Incredibly Popular

Even after widespread protests over police brutality and racial profiling, a majority of the public thinks cops are doing well "protecting the safety and rights of minorities."

To Reduce Gun Violence, Know Thy Neighbor

How a sense of community can help stop a bullet.

The Perils of Excessive Policing, in Both the U.S. and France

Neither country can afford to let the recent attacks in Paris distort the policy debate on the role of law enforcement.  

The Restaurant of Second Chances

Acclaimed Dallas chef Chad Houser opens a permanent home for Café Momentum, giving on-the-job training to young offenders.

Taiwan's Rivers Are Flowing with the Drug Ecstasy

Scientists are pointing the finger at a giant music festival.

Photos

Chicago's Gangster Past, Minus the Romance

A collection of photographs from the Chicago Tribune archives rejects spectacle in favor of brutal, messy truth.

The NYPD's Biggest Problem Might Actually Be an Overreliance on Numbers

A recent survey of retired New York City police officers suggests the department's culture has shifted toward data manipulation.

Paris, Locked Down

With a manhunt still underway, the city's usual bustle has been replaced with a sense of shock and heightened security.

The NYPD's Insubordination—and Why the Right Should Oppose It

The virtual work stoppage unfolding in New York City illustrates one of several ways that powerful police unions can threaten public safety as they seek political leverage.