Reuters/Shannon Stapleton

'We Disagree With Any Implication That Freddie Gray Severed His Own Spinal Cord'

A leaked police report suggests that the Baltimore man tried to injure himself, a notion that his family and supporters angrily reject.

AP Photo/Gail Burton

In Front of Zero Fans, the Baltimore Orioles Win

In a baseball first, no one was allowed to attend Wednesday's afternoon game in the city, rescheduled during a week of civil unrest.

Wikimedia Commons

The History of 'Thug'

The surprisingly ancient and global etymology of a racially charged epithet.


The Next Baltimore Orioles Game Will Be Closed to the Public

Amid unrest in Baltimore, the team will play Wednesday's game against the White Sox to an empty Camden Yards.


Baltimore Picks Itself Up After a Long, Violent Night

After hours of rioting around the city, the clean-up begins.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

'Rough Rides' and the Challenges of Improving Police Culture

Freddie Gray isn't the first person to be gravely injured while riding in a police van.

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

The Long Fuse Behind the Violence in Baltimore

The special distrust between Baltimore residents and police goes way back.

Patrick Semansky/AP

The Orioles Waited Until the Last Possible Minute to Postpone Monday Night's Game

The decision followed reports on Saturday of drunk baseball fans taunting protesters.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

More Protests, More Violence in Baltimore, and Few Answers

15 police officers are reported injured in clashes with protesters Monday.

Jose Luis Magana/Reuters

What Does It Mean When Police Unions Denounce Protestors as 'Lynch Mobs'?

Lynch mobs served as de jure law enforcement for decades in a South defined by its lack of due process for African Americans. The term speaks volumes about the current dynamic between police and a distrustful public.

AP/Patrick Semansky

The Mysterious Death of Freddie Gray

When the Baltimore man was arrested, he was alive and well. By the time he reached a police station, he couldn't breathe or talk. What happened?

AP/Rich Pedroncelli

What Are the Bounds of a Traffic Stop, According to the Supreme Court?

The nation's highest court has ruled that police officers can't draw out a stop for the sole reason of waiting for drug sniffing dogs.

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Who Wants to Be a Police Officer?

How high-profile cases involving excessive force and racial bias are affecting U.S. law enforcement recruiting efforts.

How Livable Will Your Neighborhood Be as You Age?

The AARP's new “livability index” grades communities on seven resource areas that aging Americans will need.

AP/Elise Amendola

A Marathon Through the Shadows

Despite the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial, Boston's annual race begins to resemble itself.

Yes! That's Us / Screenshot from 'Boda Boda Thieves' trailer

Meet East Africa's New Motorcycle Gangs

The film Boda Boda Thieves explores how the traditional motorbike taxis have become part of organized crime.


What Life Is Like on the Micronation of Sealand: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Damon Shaff /

The Murky Law on Free-Range Kids

Why location matters for parents who choose to let children explore neighborhoods on their own.

How Colorado Is Trying to Convince Marijuana Enthusiasts Not to Drive Stoned

Among the state's 420-related tactics: A special car that's filled with smoke.