A Chair as Adaptive Reuse

A Brooklyn-based woodshop has made a lounger out of a New York City water tower's reclaimed timber.

Image
Bellboy

Adaptive reuse is a term that summons both excited interest and annoyance. Drop it in any conversation, and you’ll instantly gain the approval of zealous ecological do-gooders or the dreaded eye-roll from the jaded realists, too “informed” to feign optimism and jealous for not being the first to think of, say, repurposing a water tower to make awesome-looking furniture. That’s exactly what Brooklyn-based woodshop Bellboy did with their aptly-named “Water Tower” chair, a comfy undulating lounger made from reclaimed timber sourced from a certified authentic New York City water tower.

With a strikingly simple, almost Pringle-like profile, the chair oozes summer cool. The seat slopes downward toward the back, creating a pocket of space that eases the user into a lulling nap. The back of the chair narrows at the top, a refined touch that offsets the ovoid concavity of the chair base. The project brings to mind another innovative use of the city’s decommissioned water towers, this Greenwhich Village roof garden by GRAFTWORKS.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author