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Please, Sit Back and Allow Moby to Explain All About L.A.'s Architecture

Did you know Moby is an architecture blogger now?

Did you know Moby is an architectural blogger now? I didn't. I mean, look at his wiki: producer of electronica and trance, photographer, DJ, vegan, teetotaler, former Dungeons & Dragons player, lover of Christ – but unless I'm missing something, nothing about architecture.

So somebody needs to update that page, because Richard Melville Hall is all over the face of architecture. At his blog devoted to "strange and beautiful architecture in Los Angeles," the artist writes about visiting the famed home of John Lautner’s Sheats-Goldstein residence, his love of 20th-century architect Eero Saarinen, the provocative allure of strip-club marquees and, oddly, the "empty room that has absolutely no purpose" inside his own house. So the guy knows a little of what he's talking about in this here interview, set to the music of his song "Sweet Dreams."

Moby sat down to wax about his hometown's buildings to promote the upcoming exhibition, "Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A." That sprawling affair, sponsored by the Getty Trust, involves 11 exhibits and 17 cultural institutions throughout the city starting in April. Here's how the organizers describe the ambitious project:

Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. will provide a wide-ranging look at the region’s modern architectural heritage, as well as the significant contributions of L.A. architects to national and global developments in architecture. It will examine a broad array of practitioners, from pioneering modernists like Richard Neutra to Pritzker Prize winners such as Frank Gehry and Thom Mayne, as well as other visionary architects who have shaped the region’s distinctive profile, including A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Rowland Smith and Eric Owen Moss. Exhibitions and related programming will explore a range of building types, from iconic modernist homes and civic landmarks such as Disney Hall, to the whimsical coffee shops and vast freeway networks that made Los Angeles the unique megalopolis it is today.

Now take it away, Moby!

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