From Europe, a Beautifully Simple Concept for a Kick Scooter

The Pigeon folds with a foot press to carry on the shoulder like a lightweight rifle.

Kick scooters have been around for at least half a century, yet they've never managed to obtain the cool cachet of skateboards or the great practicality of bicycles. The Pigeon scooter goes some of the distance toward both these things: The streamlined, tangerine-hued design exhales style, and its lightweight frame (about 4.5 pounds) collapses to be carried on the shoulder like a color-guard's rifle.

The prototypical people-propeller is the handiwork of Ignas Survila, an art director and CGI designer in Vilnius, Lithuania. The Pigeon's simple appearance hides a couple of nifty features: a foot-press tab that makes it fold up, so the rider doesn't have to bend over, and a hidden magnet that adheres the wheel to the steering column to prevent its opening swatting a passerby in the face. An asymmetric axis gives the scooter a pleasant quirkiness, and Survila is also trying to incorporate a braking mechanism in the riding platform so people can tear down steep hills.

Survila says he wants to create a vehicle that will brighten a commuter's daily slog:

People nowadays are in a hurry in all aspects of their life, they are so eager to grow up, to earn money and to live, thus forgetting about the present days. I believe you may convert your hurrying into a delightful and pleasant process, and a kick scooter here may be a tool, helping to achieve this goal....

A lot of kick scooters are manufactured according to one model, which, however, has not been made to perfection as to be a convenient and aesthetically attractive product. Upon consideration from a new aspect the possibilities of a kick scooter, my task was to improve a model scooter eliminating some shortcomings, to brainstorm the whole consumer and servicing system, to arouse a new interest of consumers in a kick scooter as a mode of leisure and lifestyle, and to make it more consumer-friendly and not complicated in use. 

For more info on the Pigeon, try checking its page on Behance:

Images from Ignas Survila on Behance     

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