Housing

Houston/Wikimedia Commons

Americans Love Big Hot Suburbs

The neighborhoods outside of sunny metro areas are gobbling up the country, just like they were before the Great Recession.

Next Economy
Alana Semuels

The City That Believed in Desegregation

Integration isn't easy, but Louisville, Kentucky, has decided that it's worth it.

AP Photo/Matt Dunham

With London's Affordability Crisis, a New Breed of Activism

The city is grappling with major socioeconomic shifts by getting organized at an unprecedented scale.  

Maps
CartoB, via Twitter

Why Most Twitter Maps Can't Be Trusted

A sophisticated age demands a more sophisticated social media cartography.

Photos
New York Public Library/William Meyers

These Beautiful Photos Capture Everyday Moments in NYC's Outer Boroughs

Photographer William Meyers documented ordinary life outside Manhattan in the 1990s and 2000s.

Maps
Wikimedia Commons/BrokenSphere

Where Millennials Are Moving Now

New Census data shows that migration patterns among young adults changed after the Great Recession.

Next Economy
David Spinks/Flickr

Stuck With a House That Can't Be Sold

Even though the housing market is improving, some owners with troubled properties won't see relief anytime soon.

Insightful Interaction/Natalia Bronshtein

200 Years of U.S. Immigration, in 1 Colorful Infographic

A new data visualization captures the waves of arrival.

Flickr/lindenbaum

How Much Sprawl Costs America

More than $1 trillion, according to a new report.

Prime Minister's Office, Singapore

How Singapore Fixed Its Affordable Housing Problem

A 1965 newsreel looks back at a public-housing initiative led by late Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew—one that continues to influence high levels of homeownership today.

Doomsday Architecture Is More Relevant Now Than Ever

The 1970s saw a fascination with building utopias that could endure extreme climates. Thanks to global climate change, we need exactly that type of design thinking today.

Reuters/Jim Urquhart

Where LGBTQ Americans Live

New polling from Gallup tells a tale of growing tolerance.

Maps
Evan Tachovsky

Mapping the Lasting Effects of Redlining

Old federal maps and recent Census data combine to show how today's poverty rates align with racist 1930s mortgaging policies.

Videos
Oregon Humanities

The Voices of the Displaced in Portland, Oregon

"Losing those spaces means that you lose a critical element of who you are."

Next Economy
Flickr/TheMuuj

Staying Close to Home, No Matter What

Fewer than half of Americans say they're likely to relocate, even if they think their town is headed in the wrong direction.

James Gaither/Flickr Creative Commons

Why Did This San Francisco Woman Get Stuck With a $6,755 Monthly Rent Hike?

Landlords are exploiting a loophole in a law meant to protect renters.

Flickr/Images Money

The U.S. Cities Where It Takes the Longest to Be Able to Afford to Buy a Home

Metro areas in California look especially bleak in this analysis.

AP images

Why the Justice Department Chose These 6 Cities for Its Police-Community Relations Pilot

The government hopes they can serve as a blueprint for others across the country.