Housing

Emma Jacobs

Paris's Ongoing Struggle to Shelter Migrants

Mayor Anne Hidalgo announced plans last May for a triage point to orient people more quickly into the French social system and eliminate informal encampments from city streets.

Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Is Detroit Really Making a Comeback?

Though it is back from the brink of bankruptcy, the city’s reality isn’t as rosy as the popular narrative suggests.

Photos
AP

The Cities That Have Risen From Ruins

Whether they’ve been leveled by wars or earthquakes, cities don’t tend to stay wastelands forever.

Maxim Shemetov/Reuters

What Squatting Can Teach Us About Wasted Space

In an era of extreme housing precariousness, a new book looks at the history of a radical alternative.

Panoramic Interests

To House the Homeless, Berkeley Considers Stackable 'Microunits'

The city wants to erect a tower made of stacked, prefab 160-square-foot apartments.

(AP Photo/Jim Wells)

The Meaning of Blight

A word that was originally about plant diseases became “infused with racial and ethnic prejudice” when it moved to the city.

Dream Empire/Courtesy of David Borenstein

I Was a White Guy for Rent in a Chinese Ghost City

A filmmaker shares his experience in the once-lucrative business of hiring foreigners to lure homebuyers in China’s building boom.

Library of Congress

Lessons From the 'Sanctuary Cities' of the Slavery Era

Before the Civil War, Northern states opted out of enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act—and the Supreme Court backed them up.

Maria Danilova/AP

What Could Reverse D.C'.s Intense School Segregation?

Not more charter schools, says the author of a new UCLA Civil Rights Project report: School choice is only exacerbating the effects of the city’s extreme housing segregation.

Martin Abegglen/flickr

In Germany's Priciest Cities, Renters Should Finally Get Some Relief

After climbing sharply for years, housing costs are guaranteed to drop in Berlin, according to a new report.

Terrence Hector

Imagining a World of Massive Cities That Crawl Across the Earth

An architect dreamed up these hulking biostructures that humans exploit for energy.

Jim Young/Reuters

Welcome to the 'Great Divergence'

Before 1980, places in America with lower average incomes grew faster than their richer counterparts, so that incomes converged. Today, that’s no longer the case.

Facebook/Tishaura Jones

Understanding a St. Louis Mayoral Candidate's Viral Takedown of a Local Newspaper

Just in case you have any questions about Tishaura Jones’s letter slamming the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s editorial board, CityLab has you covered.

Wisconsin Historical Society/Courtesy of Yale University Press

The Wastelands of Urban Renewal

Through large-scale demolition and clearance, American urban renewal waged a war on perceived waste—and created a new tide of it.

Joseph Pisenti/Real Life Lore

Could the Human Race Fit in a Single City?

How about a single building?

CityFixer
Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters

Venice Fights Back

The world's most beautiful city has never been more threatened. But a passionate movement of locals is determined to keep it alive.

Robert Galbraith/REUTERS

San Francisco Is So Expensive Even Renters Can Be NIMBYs

Rent anxiety and fears of displacement fuel support for obstructing market-rate housing in pricey cities.

Navigator
Courtesy of GrokHome

What It's Really Like to Live in a 'Dorm for Adults'

I live in a “hacker house,” but I’m not a tech bro. Here’s why it’s not so crazy to share a home with 17 roommates.

Rick Wilking/Reuters

The Building Code Profession Is Dying Out, and That's a Problem

Many of the officials who check construction plans and inspect buildings for safety are on the cusp of retirement—and they’re not being replaced.