Housing

Wikimedia Commons/Graeme Maclean

The Pernicious Realities of 'Artwashing'

In expensive London, artists are caught in the middle of developers' attempts to push out lower-income residents and rebrand neglected properties.

Specht Harpman Architects

When Micro-Housing Misses the Point

A precious jewel-box tiny house isn't the same as dense, sustainable living. 

Taras Grescoe

How Denver Is Becoming the Most Advanced Transit City in the West

But the key question remains: Will metro residents give up their cars?

Reuters/Steve Marcus

Where Cities Are Growing Faster Than Their Suburbs

In 19 of the 51 largest U.S. metros, including knowledge centers like New York, the city grew faster than the suburbs last year.

Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Outraged Canadians Report the Detroit Water Authority to the UN for Human-Rights Violations

Is there a plan to force the gentrification of Detroit through overdue water bills? And should the United Nations take action? The Council of Canadians thinks so.

Building Detroit

Watch Detroit Tackle Blight in Real Time

Sales of previously vacant homes are steadily racking up on the Building Detroit auction site.

Reuters/Tony Gentile

In Europe, Knowing Your Neighbor Doesn't Necessarily Make You Happier

A surprising result from a pan-European survey on happiness.

All Aboard Florida

The Triumphant Return of Private U.S. Passenger Rail

Can new train service between Miami and Orlando be a model for the rest of the country?

Axio on Flickr

Toronto and the Condo Kid: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A round-up of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Dublin, Ohio / Crawford Hoying

What Transit Will Actually Look Like in the New Suburbia

Or, why we should fall in love with ride-share, buses, and walking.

David Torke, fixBuffalo

Riding Through Poor Neighborhoods With New Urbanists

A bike tour in Buffalo that aimed to "inspire feelings of civic duty and moral outrage" may have also exposed weaknesses in a movement's philosophy.

Mike Blake/Reuters

Why Renters Are Ending Up in the Suburbs

Most new homes being built in the U.S. are multifamily apartments, but more and more people are opting for an even cheaper rental option: the traditional suburban single-family home.

Robert Galbraith/Reuters

How the Bay Area's Waterfront Height Limit Could Be a Disaster for Waterfront Resiliency

San Francisco voters just approved the kind of urban-planning tool that makes resilient design so difficult: direct democracy.

Flickr/Fairfax County/WDG Architecture

The Colossal Expectations of D.C.'s Newest Metro Line

There's not much riding on the Silver Line except the future of the American suburb as we know it. 

St. Stephen's Human Services

The Lives of America's Homeless

An oral-history project seeks to document some of the least-heard voices in society: those with no permanent address. 

Brian Whitty

Peak Eviction Came to San Francisco Back in the 1990s

The tech boom has seen a rise in renter evictions, but the practice was perfected during the dot com madness of the late '90s.

Shutterstock.com

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.

Mark Byrnes

Funeral for a Philadelphia Rowhouse

On the eve of its demolition, a memorial service remembers the life of one of the last homes on a single block in the Mantua neighborhood.