Cleveland

Fixing the Rust Belt by Shrinking It

New studies suggest that we can revitalize the Rust Belt by increasing core density

The Best Of 'Best Ofs' of 2011

A round-up of the strangest city highlights from alternative weeklies around the country

The Folly of Corporate Relocation Incentives

When cities compete to lure big companies, no one wins

Cleveland Lays Out the Welcome Mat

Global Cleveland hopes to use the city's economic growth and downtown development to lure 100,000 new residents

Is Blotting the Best Solution for Shrinking Cities?

In places like Cleveland, Detroit, and Chicago, homeowners are being encouraged to expand the footprint of their properties

Cleveland's New Deal-Era Public Housing Posters

The Midwest city's approach was much friendlier than New York's

Another Reason to Stop Building New Homes: Job Creation

Repairing existing residential buildings produces about 50 percent more jobs than building new ones

The Death Row of Urban Highways

10 roads whose days cutting through cities are nearly numbered

Reimagining the Downtown Casino

Cincinnati's first casino will incorporate a consciously urban design

Keeping Stadium Neighborhoods Alive in the Off-Season

Cleveland finds a way to embrace winter at Progressive Field

Desperately Seeking Stability in Cleveland's Fragile Housing Market

The threat of foreclosure still looms large in metropolitan Cleveland

A Grassroots Guide to Saving the Rust Belt

Jack Storey of the group Saving Cities on their new film, 'Red, White & Blueprints'

The Big Cities of a Child's Imagination

Recollections of what the wider urban world seemed like as a kid growing up in a small Southern city

Redeveloping Former Industrial Sites Doesn't Mean Giving Up on Industry

Brownfield projects in Philadelphia, Cleveland, and Toledo aim to reimagine what manufacturing means in America

Cleveland Doubles Down on Mandatory Recycling

Despite criticism, all city households will have garbage bins with tracking devices by 2015

Is Bicycle Commuting Really Catching On? And if So, Where?

A survey of 55 major U.S. cities shows big gains in many places, but plenty of regional variation