Washington, DC

Flickr/James D. Schwartz

Rant of the Day: Washington's Bikeshare Is for Smug Socialists

A local journalist offers a strange diatribe against D.C.'s bikeshare program.

Courtesy: Voteprime/Flickr

Washington's Growing Pains

D.C. is booming, but families, minorities and the poor may be left out.


The Pseudo-Suburbanist's Dilemma

I grew up hating the suburbs, but now I fear I might be living in one. What does this say about me?


Why We Pay More for Walkable Neighborhoods

New data points to the economic power of walkable neighborhoods – and the high cost of living in them.


Remember the Fallen

An annual ritual at Arlington National Cemetery.

Courtesy: Sarah Brailey

Fighting Climate Change With a 300-Mile Bike Ride

200 riders peddled from New York to Washington on the annual Climate Ride.


What Will New York City's Bike Share Program Mean for Rider Safety?

Bike lanes could keep accident rates low, even without helmets.


In D.C., Baseball-Oriented Development Seems, at Last, to Be Working

How Nationals Park, to the surprise of its neighbors, is leading to a better community.

Walk Score

Walk Score Launches Bike Score

How bikeable is your city?


Best Places for New College Grads, 2012

The job market for this year's college graduates is tough, but choosing the right city can make all the difference.


America's Most Powerful Global Cities

Sizing up the global clout of U.S. cities.


Urban Sustainability's Missing Ingredient? Education

The best way to make cities greener might be teaching residents what that actually means.


Argument of the Day: Want Affordable Housing? Look to the Zoning Code

Activists should think beyond public subsidies.


The Top U.S. Cities for New Home Construction

Where construction markets are picking up again.


Rita Crundwell: America's New Queen of Municipal Embezzlement

According to feds, the former Dixon, Illinois, comptroller spent much of the $53 million she's accused of stealing on horses with names like "Packin' Jewels" and "Have Faith in Money."

AIA courtesy Prelinger Archive

'No Time for Ugliness': A 1965 Case for Better Cities

Even 47 years ago, American architects saw the perils of sprawl and car-oriented development.

William Henry Jackson; The National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

The Evolution of the American Dream, from Colonial Times to Today

A big new exhibit at the National Building Museum explores the history of house and home in the U.S.


Have Guitar, Will Sing Songs About Urban Planning

Melanie Hammet wants to turn obscure zoning ordinances into the universal language of song.


The Fascinating Story of How Those Tropical Insects Made It Into Your Starbucks Coffee

Starbucks has said it's stopping the use of bug-based red dye. Why? Making the stuff looks like so much fun!