Politics

Routes North/Flickr

What's Wrong With Sweden?

The bizarre Twitter assault on the Scandinavian nation’s immigration policies may be based on a fiction—but that doesn’t mean all is well in Malmö.

H.B. Littel/AP

Louisville Confronts Its Redlining Past and Present

A new online mapping project is aimed at dismantling the Kentucky city’s grim legacy of racial segregation.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

For Schools, Gambling Funding Is No Jackpot

Though states often pledge to fund public schools with taxes levied on lotteries and casinos, that money tends to get funneled elsewhere.  

Emma Jacobs

Paris's Ongoing Struggle to Shelter Migrants

Mayor Anne Hidalgo announced plans last May for a triage point to orient people more quickly into the French social system and eliminate informal encampments from city streets.

David Ryder/AP

Could Gang Affiliation Be Used to Round Up DACA Recipients?

Immigration rights advocates fear that gang membership will be an easy way to criminalize whole groups of people.

Courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room–Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

How Charlotte's Nasty Early 1900s Politics Paved the Way for a Century of Segregation

During the late 19th century, blacks and whites in the South lived closer together than they do today.

Amr Nabil/AP

The Politics Clogging Transportation Reform in Egypt

An emphasis on building wide roads and highways bring the government a façade of prestige without benefiting average people.

Alex Brandon/AP

The School-Voucher Paradox

In Louisiana, an initiative reduced segregation in the education system, but not all families saw it.

Maria Danilova/AP

What Could Reverse D.C'.s Intense School Segregation?

Not more charter schools, says the author of a new UCLA Civil Rights Project report: School choice is only exacerbating the effects of the city’s extreme housing segregation.

Mohammad Khursheed/Reuters

Another Front in the Texas War to Preserve Segregated Housing

A new bill to change the application for housing tax credits would make it virtually impossible to build new low-income housing anywhere in the Lone Star State.

Gosia Wozniacka/AP

The Threat of Deportation Looms Large in California Farm Country

Hundreds of thousands of farmworkers without official papers have lived in the U.S. for more than a decade. They now worry that the American dream is slipping away.

Kirill Iordansky/Reuters

Berlin's 'Devil's Mountain': Built From Rubble, And Going to Waste

One of the most historically resonant sites in Germany’s capital has been left in ruins.

Damian Dovarganes/AP

What Should a City's Foreign Policy Look Like?

For those who care about combating climate change, keeping the country safe for immigrants, and prioritizing LGBT and other human rights issues, it might now be time for mayors to take up the fight.

Dylan Peers McCoy

The School for Refugees

A public school in Indianapolis is more than just open to students new to America—it was made for them.

Facebook/Tishaura Jones

Understanding a St. Louis Mayoral Candidate's Viral Takedown of a Local Newspaper

Just in case you have any questions about Tishaura Jones’s letter slamming the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s editorial board, CityLab has you covered.

'You Made Me. And I'm Coming for You.'

Lake Erie is cleaner now that it was during the Rust Belt’s industrial heyday. But all is not well underwater.

Wisconsin Historical Society/Courtesy of Yale University Press

The Wastelands of Urban Renewal

Through large-scale demolition and clearance, American urban renewal waged a war on perceived waste—and created a new tide of it.

Josh F.W. Cook/Office of Assemblyman Brian Dahle/AP

The Oroville Dam Crisis Exposes the Flaws in Trump's Infrastructure Plan

A near-disaster in California probably wouldn’t be averted by the kind of privatized investment that the president has in mind.

CityFixer
Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters

Venice Fights Back

The world's most beautiful city has never been more threatened. But a passionate movement of locals is determined to keep it alive.