AP Photo/Paul Sancya

Flint Is Finally Getting a Reprieve From Its Tainted Water Supply

The city will reconnect with Detroit's system, but crumbling pipes remain a big problem.

AP Photo/Eric Y. Exit

For Kids, Bouncing Between Schools Has Long-Term Effects

Open-enrollment policies have good intentions, but a new study finds that students who change schools frequently have poorer math and behavior skills.

U.S. EPA Region 7

In St. Louis, Fears Rise as a Landfill Fire Nears a Radioactive Waste Site

The release of an emergency plan in case of “a catastrophic event” has locals understandably on edge.

AP Photo/Gregory Bull

Why California's Poorest Towns Still Can't Connect to Water

In the dried-out San Joaquin Valley, consolidating water systems brings out ugly politics.

Gary Cameron / REUTERS

When Neighborhoods Gentrify, Why Don't Their Public Schools Improve?

“Gentrification, it turns out, usually stops at the schoolhouse door,” the reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones has argued.

(Associated Press/Jeff Chiu)

The Last Gun Store in San Francisco Is Closing

The owners told “vultures” not to bother them as the shop clears out its inventory.

REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

As a Start to NYC Prison Reform, Jail Data Will Be Made Public

Under a new law just signed by Mayor Bill de Blasio, the city will have to cough up stats on its courts and jail systems.


The New York Eastern Correctional Facility Debate Team Trounces Harvard

The group, part of a rigorous “college experience” program for inmates, has also beaten West Point.

Henryk Sadura/Shutterstock.com

In the Montréal Area, 82 Municipalities Begin to Think and Act As One

After a contentious start, mayors from the region have come together to jointly plan a more sustainable metropolitan area.


The Future of U.S. Voting May Be U.K. Technology

British voting expert Lord Mark Malloch-Brown comes to America this week for a hard sell on Internet-based balloting.

LA Energy Atlas

L.A.'s New 'Energy Atlas' Maps Who Sucks the Most Off the Grid

Patterns of consumption fall along class lines in the nation’s most populous county.

AP Photo/Donna McWilliam

The Nation's Best Family Leave Plan Could Be Coming to D.C.

The proposed 16 weeks of paid leave could make a big difference for many caring for a new baby or sick parent.

Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

The Case for Letting Teens Vote in Local Elections

Youth activists hope to make San Francisco the first major U.S. city where 16- and 17-year-olds can cast a ballot.

REUTERS/Lee Celano

New Orleans Has a New Jobs Program. But Can It Stop Bullets?

The city council has granted the mayor’s wish requiring local hiring for city-contracted projects. Will more jobs really mean less violence?

Reuters/Ahmad Masood

What It Will Really Take to Fix India's Railways

Google and Japan will bring WiFi and odorless toilets to India's trains, but the South Asian country has a much bigger problem it needs to fix first.

Senator Stabenow / Flickr

The New Grand Bargain Between Cities and Anchor Institutions

Anchor institutions spur economic growth and innovation, but are still lacking cooperation with cities themselves.

EpicStockMedia / Shutterstock.com

How Did One Household Use 11.8 Million Gallons of Water in a Year?

CityLab speculates on what one L.A. homeowner—the biggest residential water user in the state—could possibly be up to.

AP/Tamir Kalifa

What Effect Will Shuttering Alabama DMV Offices Have on Black Voters?

The state has a strict voter ID law, yet more than 30 offices, many of them across the “Black Belt,” are set to close.

Laurin Rinder/Shutterstock.com

Guess Where Seniors Might Be Getting a Specialized Pot Dispensary

In Berkeley, of course. And the woman behind it is pretty cool.


Law Enforcement Really Doesn't Like Civilian Oversight

In New Orleans and Chicago, police officials continue to butt heads with independent monitors while the NYPD takes some steps toward accountability.