Politics

AP/Charlie Riedel

The Burden of Hosting a Super Bowl

On Sunday, Glendale, Arizona will host its second NFL championship game. History is making it hard for city officials to be excited about it.

REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

More Women Ride Mass Transit Than Men. Shouldn't Transit Agencies Be Catering to Them?

In cities like Philadelphia, a remarkable 64 percent of the people riding public transportation are thought to be women.

AP Photo/Reed Saxon

What's Really At Stake in the Battle Over Street Vending: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Harris Moure

Seattle's Hottest New Job: Pot Lawyer

Washington state's marijuana businesses face a maze of regulations. Hilary Bricken helps guide them through it.

Pool/Reuters

Poll: Spending on Infrastructure Is a Top Priority for Americans

Democrats and Republicans are at an impasse on infrastructure funding, but a majority of Americans support new spending on such investment.  

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Infrastructure Investment in the Time of Few Compromises

Important projects will get off the ground with or without Congress. It'd just be a whole lot easier with them.

REUTERS/Youssef Boudlal

The Mayor of Paris Isn't Crazy for Threatening to Sue Fox News

You have to remember that the cable news network maintains a highly peripheral position in Europe.

AP images

How Local Sales Taxes Target the Poor and Widen the Income Gap

A new report shows that low-income Americans are taxed at twice the rate as the richest one percent.

Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Poll: Police Are Still Incredibly Popular

Even after widespread protests over police brutality and racial profiling, a majority of the public thinks cops are doing well "protecting the safety and rights of minorities."

Flickr/futureshape

What Fonts Can Say About a City: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Photos
REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom

Removing Fish From a Surreal Abandoned Shopping Mall

Thousands of carp, tilapia and catfish will be relocated to less absurd settings by Bangkok officials.

Charles Platiau/Reuters

Can Architecture Unite a Divided Paris?

The curtain finally rises at the long-awaited, Jean Nouvel-designed venue—unfinished and with its architect protesting on opening night. Can it still fulfill high hopes?

AP Images

Now Big-Time Celebrities Are Campaigning to 'Save' London's Soho Neighborhood

The city's famed arts-and-sleaze district is set for major redevelopment. But all the movie-star advocates and nostalgia in the world can't preserve what's already gone.

Videos
Jared Rosenthal/YouTube

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City.

Kunal Mehta/Shutterstock.com

This Ferguson Library Twitter Hashtag Just Might Make You Feel Better About the World

How an outpouring of financial support led to #Becauseofapubliclibrary.

Mark Lennihan/AP

How the War Against Polystyrene Foam Containers Is Being Won

The passage of New York City's new rule suggests resistance to single-use foam container bans is waning.

American Spirit/Shutterstock.com

Questioning the Media's Narrative of Detroit: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Flickr/LEONARDO DASILVA

The Biggest Winner in the U.S. Olympic Bid? Worcester, Massachusetts

The case for New England's unloved second city and its supporting role in #Boston2024.

Videos

When Boston Was Desegregated, Yet Unequal

A short documentary about the legacy of Boston busing.

Letty Reimerink

How Greece's Economic Crisis Produced an Emerging Civil Society in Athens

Hundreds of groups have sprung up to help their fellow citizens with everything from a cup of coffee to prescription drugs.