San Diego's Bob Filner Reportedly Set to Resign

Details of an agreement with the city may not come until Friday.

Image
Reuters

UPDATE 4:35 P.M.: Every member of the San Diego city council has already called on Mayor Bob Filner to resign in the wake of his sexual harassment scandal. And so it's safe to assume that the council will vote on Friday to approve an agreement the city has reportedly struck with the mayor precisely because that deal contains more than a resignation. So what else is in it?

Gloria Allred, the attorney representing many of the women who've complained of harassment, preemptively came out Thursday afternoon to urge the city not to pay off the mayor to leave. At issue is whether taxpayers will help cover his legal fees in one lawsuit that Allred said has not been settled as part of the city's agreement. Local news outlets are also reporting that Filner stands to receive as much as $82,000 a year in public pensions.

Friday's council meeting will not be open to the public. And Allred, part of earlier mediation meetings with Filner this week, said she does not know the details of the deal between Filner and the city that will be on the table. But she warned the city council not to enter into "a callous and unholy agreement" with the mayor, giving him any concessions in exchange for a resignation.

"If the deal requires that the city council pay him one dollar, then I for one think that they should vote against it," Allred said Thursday. "There should be no payoff for Mayor Filner. It would be a slap in the face to the mayor’s many victims to see him get anything from the city of San Diego. His parting gift should be 'good riddance' instead of a handout."

UPDATE 2 P.M.: So what do you do if you’re Bob Filner and you’re about to have a ton of time on your hands? Of course: You write a book! Via San Diego’s ABC 10News:

SAN DIEGO - Embattled Mayor Bob Filner is leaning towards writing a tell-all book that would include details of the sexual harassment scandal among other topics,10News sources said.

Filner was recently approached by about writing a book, and now, amid a possible resignation, he is likely to agree to the idea, said one source. 

One topic could include what the source called the hypocrisy of Democratic leaders.

"Democratic leaders should be nervous," said the source.

ORIGINAL: San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who's now been accused of sexually harassing 18 women in varying degrees of graphic detail, will finally resign, according to local media reports of a settlement that's been reached with the city. The details, though, may not come out until after a closed meeting scheduled for Friday when the city council votes on whether to accept the deal.

The fine print could add final insult to injury for the city, where the scandal has been gaining steam – and new revelations from yet more women – for weeks. The big questions now are who will pay Filner's legal fees or any damages that result from lawsuits against him while in office. Filner repeatedly refused to resign, even in the face of a growing recall campaign, leaving speculation that his resignation was the last leverage he had left in negotiations with the city.

Filner spent the last three days in mediation with the city and attorney Gloria Allred, who is representing one of the women who has filed a harassment lawsuit against him. Prior to Monday, Filner had been on a three-week personal leave that included an apparently unsuccessful attempt at "therapy."

City officials announced Wednesday night that they had reached an unspecified agreement. Filner, though, was not present for the announcement. He was instead reportedly spotted loading boxes into an SUV, the universal sign of imminent unemployment.

Allred is scheduled to give a press conference at 1 p.m. Pacific time on Thursday, with, of all people, Filner's ex-fiancée. The current expectation is the mayor will formally step down on Friday. Stay tuned.

Top image: Mike Blake/Reuters

About the Author

  • Emily Badger is a former staff writer at CityLab. Her work has previously appeared in Pacific StandardGOODThe Christian Science Monitor, and The New York Times. She lives in the Washington, D.C. area.