Politics

The Link Between Religious Diversity and Economic Development

Economic success may be tied to the fact that not all of your neighbors are celebrating the same winter holiday as you.

Are Velodromes the Future of City Sports, or the Past?

Philly may take a chance on building a type of cycling arena that was immensely popular at the turn of the century, then all but abandoned.

When Gentrification Meant Driving the Hogs Out of Manhattan

In 19th-century New York, urban livestock were perceived as a threat to the image and future of the nation's largest city.

World Leaders Cobbled Together a Last-Minute Climate Deal in Peru. What Happens Next?

Stay tuned over the next several months for commitments from key players like India, Russia, and Australia.

How Italy Put Cities in Charge

The country hopes the move will get people more involved in government—and save some money.

What Did Hong Kong's Pro-Democracy Protests Really Accomplish?

Though the protesters didn't make any discernible progress towards their primary goals, there are many other ways that the movement has irrefutably changed Hong Kong.

Who Will Stop America's Plague of Hideous License Plates?

The designers behind the States Plates Project are here to help.

How Bremen, Germany, Became a Car-Sharing Paradise

The city aims to get 20,000 residents using its system by 2020.

In Miami, a Street Artist Dies at the Hands of Police

During Art Basel, a tagger called Demz was run down by police protecting street-art fans from street artists. His death has more than one connection to Eric Garner's.

Why Cities Should Be at the Forefront of Transgender Rights

States are not politically nimble enough to secure identity rights for some of their most vulnerable populations. Cities can do better.   

Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City

A New York City Council member wants the lights off at night in 40,000 commercial buildings to save the environment. Would this dim the city's iconic skyline?

An Immersive Game Shows How Easily Segregation Arises—and How We Might Fix It

"Parable of the Polygons" is playable version of Thomas Schelling's model of neighborhood segregation, with an optimistic ending.

A Battle Over Free Speech on Public Streets May Head to the Supreme Court

A confluence of "buffer zone" cases has made Worcester, Massachusetts, a First Amendment battleground.

On Immigration, Gaining the Support of Mayors Is as Much Practical as It Is Political

Cities with large foreign-born populations are likely to process the bulk of applicants following Obama's executive order.

Paris Aims to End Its Pollution Misery by Cutting Out Cars

To emerge from its toxic fug, Paris is enacting what could be the most drastic anti-pollution measures seen in any major world city.

In Southwest Chicago, Environmental Groups Must Also Grapple With a Sluggish Economy

After working together to shut down a pair of coal plants, three grassroots organizations no longer see exactly eye to eye on the best way forward for their community.

Was Monday's Fire in Downtown L.A. an 'Architectural Hate Crime'?

The destroyed building was to be the latest mega-complex by a detested local developer.

It's Far Too Simple to Dismiss Staten Island for 'Being Staten Island'

Understanding the history of New York’s "forgotten borough" puts the Eric Garner case in an important context: suburbia.

Photos

The Last Homesteads of Wonder Valley, California

Remnants of a final wave of federal land grants, hundreds of 1950s "jackrabbit homesteads" still haunt a distant corner of the Mojave desert.