Politics

Biking Toward Women's Rights in Afghanistan

Every day, the Women's National Cycling Team of Afghanistan faces ridicule and threats. And still they ride—with their eyes on the 2020 Olympics.

Universal Preschool Won't Help Americans Enter the Middle Class

Students need continued support outside the classroom through strong summer programs and after-school care.

Is Anyone Happy With Their Local Schools?

Hispanics largely are, but African Americans aren't, according to the State of the City Poll. 

Maps

The Many Ways to Map the Islamic 'State'

Is ISIS carving out borders by controlling infrastructure? It depends on your definition of 'control.'

This Year, We'll See Big Differences in the Roles of Cops in U.S. Schools

As classes resume, school districts around the country try different approaches toward police on campus. 

Barcelona Organizes Against 'Binge Tourism'—and Eyes a Street Protester for Mayor

Neighborhood organizers in the city's Barceloneta neighborhood band together to demand a crackdown on an unruly tourism industry. Is this the beginning of a new civic revolution?

States With Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Overdose Deaths

A new study suggests that in states where it's legal, some people use pot to manage their chronic health conditions, rather than more addictive—and deadly—prescription opioids.

How Will We Slow the World's Exploding Population?

If we want to solve the population problem, we need to help moms and babies survive.

Photos

Dispatches From Saturday's 'We Will Not Go Back' March in NYC

 At a peaceful protest in memory of Eric Garner and against police brutality, anger and hope rise up.

Overall, Americans in the Suburbs Are Still the Happiest

The first results of our State of the City Poll. 

The Idea Behind India's 'Rice Bucket Challenge'

Needs are different and water is too scarce to dump over your head—so the pay-it-forward donation trend gets a twist in India. 

How Ferguson Can Recover

Advice for a town torn asunder from mayors who have been there.

There Are Echoes of Ferguson in Detroit

A wealthy white suburb is building barricades to seal itself off from Detroit, but the divide is about more than physical barriers. 

Rich People Exercise, Poor People Take Diet Pills

More sustainable weight-loss strategies are accessible to those with means, but other factors contribute to the rise of obesity in poorer communities.  

And Here's Your CityLab Editor Doing the Ice Bucket Challenge

Brrrrrrrr. 

How to Save America's Crumbling Bridges While Congress Gets Its Funding Act Together

Infrastructure sensors can detect safety hazards, improve traffic flows, and even help generate revenue.

Photos

Is Japan's Love of Pachinko Fading?

The semi-legal game faces potential regulation, and parlor operators may have to compete with new casino resorts.

Should Cops Have to Live Where They Work?

The question of whether police officers should live in the communities they patrol has a long and contentious history.

What Paul Ryan Won't Say About Ferguson

The House Republican wants to lead on poverty and change, but he can't lead on the changes that Ferguson needs.