Politics

Flickr/Jeffrey Bary

The Last Seltzer Man in New York City: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

AP/Charlie Riedel

The Burden of Hosting a Super Bowl

On Sunday, Glendale, Arizona will host its second NFL championship game. History is making it hard for city officials to be excited about it.

REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

More Women Ride Mass Transit Than Men. Shouldn't Transit Agencies Be Catering to Them?

In cities like Philadelphia, a remarkable 64 percent of the people riding public transportation are thought to be women.

AP Photo/Reed Saxon

What's Really At Stake in the Battle Over Street Vending: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Harris Moure

Seattle's Hottest New Job: Pot Lawyer

Washington state's marijuana businesses face a maze of regulations. Hilary Bricken helps guide them through it.

Pool/Reuters

Poll: Spending on Infrastructure Is a Top Priority for Americans

Democrats and Republicans are at an impasse on infrastructure funding, but a majority of Americans support new spending on such investment.  

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Infrastructure Investment in the Time of Few Compromises

Important projects will get off the ground with or without Congress. It'd just be a whole lot easier with them.

REUTERS/Youssef Boudlal

The Mayor of Paris Isn't Crazy for Threatening to Sue Fox News

You have to remember that the cable news network maintains a highly peripheral position in Europe.

AP images

How Local Sales Taxes Target the Poor and Widen the Income Gap

A new report shows that low-income Americans are taxed at twice the rate as the richest one percent.

Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Poll: Police Are Still Incredibly Popular

Even after widespread protests over police brutality and racial profiling, a majority of the public thinks cops are doing well "protecting the safety and rights of minorities."

Flickr/futureshape

What Fonts Can Say About a City: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Photos
REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom

Removing Fish From a Surreal Abandoned Shopping Mall

Thousands of carp, tilapia and catfish will be relocated to less absurd settings by Bangkok officials.

Charles Platiau/Reuters

Can Architecture Unite a Divided Paris?

The curtain finally rises at the long-awaited, Jean Nouvel-designed venue—unfinished and with its architect protesting on opening night. Can it still fulfill high hopes?

AP Images

Now Big-Time Celebrities Are Campaigning to 'Save' London's Soho Neighborhood

The city's famed arts-and-sleaze district is set for major redevelopment. But all the movie-star advocates and nostalgia in the world can't preserve what's already gone.

Videos
Jared Rosenthal/YouTube

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City.

Kunal Mehta/Shutterstock.com

This Ferguson Library Twitter Hashtag Just Might Make You Feel Better About the World

How an outpouring of financial support led to #Becauseofapubliclibrary.

Mark Lennihan/AP

How the War Against Polystyrene Foam Containers Is Being Won

The passage of New York City's new rule suggests resistance to single-use foam container bans is waning.

American Spirit/Shutterstock.com

Questioning the Media's Narrative of Detroit: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Flickr/LEONARDO DASILVA

The Biggest Winner in the U.S. Olympic Bid? Worcester, Massachusetts

The case for New England's unloved second city and its supporting role in #Boston2024.