Politics

Videos

Inside the Georgia Town Where Guns Are the Law

In Kennesaw, since 1982, each head of household must own a working firearm with ammunition.

Who Wants Disposable Plastic Water Bottles in National Parks?

The bottled water industry is lobbying hard to overturn waste-reducing bans in parks, claiming concerns about dehydration and health.

Pope Francis the Urbanist

Mayors from around the world are gathering this week at the Vatican, which has quietly put together a record of urban innovation both inside its walls and across Rome.

Why You Don't Really Care About the Next 'Big One'

Terrible natural disasters will come someday, but most people have a hard time worrying about stuff that isn’t imminent.

How Slavery Built Charleston

Two historians are trying to memorialize locations in the city where slaves were openly sold and auctioned. And they’re everywhere.

Photos

A Migrant's Trek Through Macedonia

A stressful but critical step in the journey for many Syrians and Iraqis on their way north through Europe.

Does Seattle's Trash Monitoring Violate Privacy Rights?

The city’s ban on the disposal of food scraps and other compostables with garbage is met with a lawsuit.

The Privatization of Public Utilities Has One Major Upside

When it comes to complying with important health regulations, private companies far outperform the public sector.

Meet WNYC's Newest Reporter: This Old Pay Phone

It’s asking New Yorkers, “What does Eric Garner mean to you?”

Get Ready for the Awesome Power of the 'Milwaukee Ripple Effect'

The era of the publicly financed stadium lives on.

How Fair Housing Will Turn Liberal Cities Conservative

The zoning arguments and policies that will win over liberal white homeowners won’t mention race or class directly. But they will restrict the density that makes sense for affordable housing.

The Vision Zero Message Is Finally Getting Through in New York

A robust turnout at a recent rally indicates progress in terms of public awareness and support.

When Your City's Longtime Mayor Gets Charged With 499 Criminal Counts of Thievery

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, nearly went bankrupt. As Stephen Reed is charged with theft, bribery, corruption, and more, residents may now find out why.

Get Off Robert Moses's Lawn

The man who modernized New York angrily took on his critics in a 1962 essay for The Atlantic.

Why We Should Embrace the Urban Nap: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

A Petition Against a D.C. 7-11 and the Crypto-Classism of NIMBYism

#NewDC yuppies move to stop a 7-11 from opening in a gentrifying neighborhood they’d never have touched 15 years ago. But they’re really objecting to its customer type.

It's About to Get Easier For California Farmers to Conserve Water—And Sell It

One startup wants to fix California’s water market. But shouldn’t the state be doing more?

South Carolina's Confederate Flag Finally Comes Down, But Its Legacy Will Die Hard

State legislator Harold Mitchell says he’s happy the flag is falling, but that the politics of its statehouse supporters will continue to affect poor minority communities.

The Baltimore Police Union's Problem With Anthony Batts Was That He Followed Best Practices

The Fraternal Order of Police’s scathing report, issued hours before the commissioner was fired, suggests that Batts was following guidelines from the White House’s 21st Century Policing Task Force.