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Shane Pope/Flickr

Should Colleges Be Broadband Hubs for Their Communities?

The University of Texas is implementing a tiered-price web-acccess structure, while four North Carolina universities are joining their cities in building an accessible regional network.

Animi Causa

A Scratch-Off Globe to Track Your Travels

Enabled by lotto-ticket technology.

The Number One Thing We Could Do to Improve City Life, According to Geoffrey West, M. Sanjayan, Jennifer Pahlka, and More

Leading voices from this year's Aspen Ideas Festival. 

George Ross/Getty Images

We're Moving Beyond Energy Efficiency Into 'Demand Destruction'

Hybrid cars, solar panels, and LED lightbulbs aren't just reducing our energy consumption—they're totally upending it.

Community Design Resource Center

The Cheap, Colorful Way Cities Are Trying to Fight Childhood Obesity

Playground designers are hoping kids will hopscotch their way to fitness—but it might not work quite that way.

Danny Howard/Flickr

Strong Mayor, Weak Mayor, No Mayor—In Terms of Policy, It May Not Matter Much

Efforts to reform municipal governance systems have little impact on actual policies, researchers say. 

The Atlantic/Nick Danforth

15 Maps That Don't Explain the Middle East at All

The region as it never was, could have been, and sort of is. 

Reuters/Jason Lee

China Is Ending Its Skewed 'Hukou' Public-Aid System, but That Won't Help the Rural Poor

The two-tiered assistance plan has long put rural recipients at a disadvantage, and touted changes may actually enforce inequality in benefits.

REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

The Troubling Decline of American Business Dynamism

Despite the startup buzz, the U.S. is far less entrepreneurial than it was a decade ago. 

AP

Rating Humanity's Response to Detroit's Water Crisis

The good, the symbolic, and the ugly.

Blitzortung

Crowdsourcing Lightning Strikes Actually Works Pretty Well

A Dusseldorf-based network has linked more than 800 low-priced lightning detectors around the globe.

Keith Barry

What I Learned Riding One of Those New Private City Buses

Bridj won't compete with Boston public transit, but it could get some commuters of out their cars.

ManServants

The 'ManServants' Startup Is Not for Sex, but It Should Be

ManServants is billing itself as an Uber-like service for cabana boys. In a better world, it would work even more like Uber, and it would work for sex.

I Quant NY

Graphing New Yorkers' Lives Through the Open Data Portal

The I Quant NY blog mines NYC's massive data clearinghouse to visualize issues facing city dwellers, from education to eating.

Kyler Zeleny

Documenting the Sparsely Populated Canadian West

A "visual sociologist" photographs dozens of small towns and their struggle to stay relevant in the 21st century.

Mark Plummer/Flickr

Requiem for a Nightmare

The fate of the FBI's J. Edgar Hoover Building—maybe the most despised structure in Washington, D.C.—is virtually sealed. As Brutalism edges toward extinction, cities should take stock.

Associated Press

UCLA Is Recovering From a 10-Million-Gallon Flood

In the middle of California's terrible drought, students boogie-boarded their way through a massive water-main break yesterday.

Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Why the Mets Are Right to Save the New York State Pavilion

With change in Queens arriving rapidly, the Mets can preserve a piece of team history—and public good will—by helping to restore a part of the World's Fair from 50 years ago.

Jos Dielis/Flickr

Why Seville Is Banning Outdoor Domino Games

The city is rolling out several new noise-muffling measures, but the real problem may be the way Spanish cities are constructed.