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(Baz Ratner/Reuters)

Building an Unhackable Autonomous Vehicle

We should investigate the many ways hackers could disrupt self-driving cars before we begin deploying them.

The NoPhone Team

Maybe You Should Get a NoPhone Instead

Introducing a phone-shaped block that does nothing—except free you from smartphone shackles.

Brett VA/Flickr Creative Commons

Can Waving Orange Flags Really Make Pedestrians Safer?

More cities are trying to make crossing the street less deadly by handing out low-tech flags. But does this just make walkers seem weird?

LoloStock/Shutterstock.com

It's Getting Harder to Dismiss the Thames as That 'Dirty Old River'

Several new efforts to clean up London's long-polluted waterway appear to be working. One day soon, you might even be able to take a slime-free swim.

Peter Andrews/Reuters

The War on Coal Is a Culture War

There's a sharp divide between liberal coastal states leading the charge against fossil fuels and the conservative, inland states that still depend on them.

Reuters

Texas Is Mad That Mexico Won't Share the Rio Grande's Water

Mexico owes the U.S. a lot of water—but that country is experiencing a major drought, too. 

Brian Smithson/Flickr

Rethinking the Urban Cemetery

The future of burial might be interactive—or it might be eco-compostable.

Flickr/Halsenberg Media

With Vastly Lower Costs, Mid-Size Cities Give the Hard Sell to Start-Ups

Affordability and public support is helping a handful of Southern U.S. cities seem more attractive to entrepreneurs. But can it last?

Reuters/Rafael Marchante

European Wildfires Could Be 200 Percent Worse by the End of 2100

Blame more hot weather and longer droughts for a predicted uptick in land-blackening blazes.

Shutterstock.com

It's Crucial Not to Forget That Nearly Everyone Still Drives to Work

In every urban demographic group in our State of City poll, the majority commuted by car.

Smartphones and the Uncertain Future of 'Spatial Thinking'

Navigation apps are transforming the way we experience urban environments, for better and for worse.

Erion Shehaj/Flickr

Strategic Reforestation Could Be the Key to Fighting Ozone

Scientists working in smoggy Houston say planting a 1.5-square-mile forest would make the air more breathable.

Flickr/Bluedharma

How Will We Eat Once We've Colonized Mars?

We might be able to garden. 

Reuters/Robert Galbraith

Americans Work Longer Hours—and Stranger Hours

Americans are far more likely to work on weekends or in the dead of night.

Flickr/David Salafla

Yet Another Reason to Like Green Neighborhoods: They're Associated With Healthier Births

Over the course of 3 years, pregnant women living in Vancouver’s greenest neighborhoods delivered healthier babies than those in less tree-lined communities.

Anthony Flint

When Neighborhood Re-Branding Celebrates What's Disappearing

"Branding" revamped neighborhoods for a barely past history can feel like a backhanded homage.

Facebook

The Geography of NFL Fandom

The Patriots really do rule New England, and the Cowboys might just be America's team. But after that, things get complicated.

Jerry Hagstrom

American Farms are in Jeopardy—Because of Inefficient Rail Service

Some farmers are facing a crisis this harvest season because trains aren't keeping up with transport demand.

Shutterstock.com

Germs Spread Unbelievably Fast in the Workplace

It can take as little as 2 hours for one stomach-flu sufferer to contaminate half of a single office.