All Articles

A Globe-Spanning Accent Map for the Word 'Potato'

Potayto! Puhtato! Portaturggh!

In Brazil, Where Police Killings Are Commonplace, Cell Phone Cameras Play a Powerful Role

More than 75 percent of Brazilians over the age of 10 now have mobile phones, which means someone's always watching.

Keeping the Beat in a Troubled Neighborhood

Members of the Soul Tigers Marching Band find stability amid the chaos of adolescence and difficult circumstances.

When Yelpers Review Entire Cities

Why travel at all when the most reasonable, thoughtful people on the Internet have rated the world's metropolises for you?

A Postcard App With a Historical Twist

ScenePast lets you send a note with a classic 20th century streetscape from your mobile device. But it's also got an addictive second feature.

The Eiffel Tower: Now With More Vertigo

Paris' greatest tourist draw gets a new, heart-stopping feature.

The Science of New York City’s Mythic Bagel-Making Water

It's all about the ratio of total dissolved solids in a given water sample.

Mogadishu Gets Its First ATM

In a city that's struggled for peace and solid infrastructure, its 1.5 million residents can finally draw cash.

What Firechat's Success in Hong Kong Means for a Global Internet

The app now connecting political protesters could soon connect people in the developing world.

London Gets Flooded With Eerie, Disembodied Chickens

No, there's not a serial killer targeting poultry.

Seattle May Miss Its NBA Team, but Its Old Arena Doesn't

After losing millions of dollars during the Sonics' final years, the 52-year-old Key Arena is a moneymaker again.

An Illustrated Guide to the Insane Housing Boom in Washington, D.C.

A new report covers the meteoric growth of the city's real estate market.

Why Can't Transportation Mega-Projects Be Both Beautiful and Practical?

In New York City's $4 billion PATH Hub, form overtakes function.

The 30-Year Quest to Find the Brain's Transit Center

Science has solved a centuries-old question: How does the mind process space?

Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937

Self-checkouts feel like a product of the disconnected Internet age, but Clarence Saunders pushed them nearly 80 years ago.

What 50 Years of Bullet Trains Have Done for Japan

A case study in making a small country even smaller.

Why Can't Austin Attract International Students?

One of America's rising tech hubs may suffer unless it draws more foreign students to its universities—and welcomes them into the larger culture.

NYC's Smartphone-Tracking Phone Booths Do Not Mark the Data Privacy Apocalypse

When it comes to targeted advertising, there's much, much worse out there.

Dutch Designers Just Made Your Market Look Sorry

A clever combined market and apartment project navigates strict Dutch laws for food and housing.