All Articles

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

A Win for the U.S. World Cup Team Is a Win for U.S. Bars and Restaurants

For several bars in Washington, D.C., sales have jumped 50 percent during World Cup games. The U.S. should win for pride. It should also win for the economy.

Food Huggers

Simple Reusable Food Savers to Keep Your Summer Fruits and Veggies Fresh

Food Huggers promise “less waste, more taste."

Cruise Automation

This Gadget Allows Regular Cars to (Almost) Drive Themselves

While several car manufacturers (and Google) are working on building autonomous cars, a startup is looking for another way to go driverless.

Patrick Fallon/Reuters

Where the War on Drugs Is Actually Like a War Zone

A new report from the ACLU shows how U.S. law-enforcement agencies are prosecuting an increasingly militarized War on Drugs, especially in majority-minority communities.

Flickr/Carlos Gomez

Does San Francisco's Smart Parking System Reduce Cruising for a Space?

By most measures, yes. By one big one, maybe not.

Radius Books/Alex Webb

Faces of a Shrinking Company Town

A new photography book explores Rochester in the 12 months following Kodak's bankruptcy filing. 

Urban Reviewer

Every Master Plan in New York City History, Collected in a Single Place

A Brooklyn group tracked the history of the city's urban-renewal projects—and gave some still-vacant spots a future.

Claudio Divizia/Shutterstock.com

Tax Rates Aren't What Small Business Owners Say They Really Care About

Instead, they care more about how easy it is to keep up with rules, regulations, and tax filings. 

Altaf Qadri/Associated Press

How Climate Change Will Lead to More Deadly Stagnant-Air Days

Many regions, including the U.S, are expected to experience yet more frequent "still-air events" later this century.

A Handful of São Paulo Trash Cans Got a World-Cup Makeover

Several of them now look like squat men carrying garbage bins as backpacks. Here's why.

City of Los Angeles

Why Cities Should Be More Skeptical of New Cultural Centers and Expansions

On the other side of a major U.S. arts building boom, some civic leaders still think that luring cultural centers—no matter the cost—means instant success.

Mother Jones

These Maps Show How Many Brutally Hot Days You're Likely to Suffer When You're Old

It could be over 95 degrees most of the year in Florida by the time Millennials retire. 

Wikimedia Commons/Graeme Maclean

The Pernicious Realities of 'Artwashing'

In expensive London, artists are caught in the middle of developers' attempts to push out lower-income residents and rebrand neglected properties.

WildCare photo by Janet Kessler

What to Do When You Find a Wild Animal in Distress

It doesn't take much to help injured, sick, or out-of-place urban wildlife.

Reuters/Eric Thayer

New York City Residents Can Control Their A/C From Their Smartphones This Summer

And it's totally free if you're already a Con Edison customer. 

Specht Harpman Architects

When Micro-Housing Misses the Point

A precious jewel-box tiny house isn't the same as dense, sustainable living. 

Taras Grescoe

How Denver Is Becoming the Most Advanced Transit City in the West

But the key question remains: Will metro residents give up their cars?

AP/Mark 'Storm' Farnik

Can We Stop Tornadoes by Building a Giant Wall?

It's maybe not such a dumb idea. 

NRK

You Can Now Ride on a Train While Flying on a Plane

British Airways has revealed the Turducken of in-flight entertainment.