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Project Connect

Austin's Rail-or-Fail Vote Is Uniting Transit Supporters and Foes

Facing down a determined opposition, Austin is wise to plan for growth with its new rail project—even if that means investing in areas where demand is only starting to arrive.

Tomáš Moravec

Think You Can Shred? Try Skateboarding a Pallet Down Tram Tracks

We don't actually recommend that. But one skater has developed something way cooler than any longboard.

A Chinese City Has Been Quarantined After Reports of Plague

The Black Death is back. In China. Right now. 

sherwood/Shutterstock.com

Morning People Are More Likely to Lie to Their Bosses in the Afternoon

And night owls tend to be less ethical in the morning. Siestas might make everyone behave a little better.

Reuters/Jorge Silva

The World's Tallest Slum Is Being Cleared by the Venezuelan Government

It's been called "a pirate utopia." But the eviction of 3,000 residents is no solution to Caracas' glaring poverty and desperate housing shortage.

NOAA

Looking Back at America's Largest Hailstone

On this day in 2010, a town in South Dakota was visited by a two-pound ice monster from the sky.

Courtesy the Government of the State of Ceará

Why the U.S. Is Building a Fantastical Aquarium in Brazil

An exotic new aquarium under construction in Brazil is a lightning rod on two continents—and the latest test of the theory that where weird designs go, new cities follow.

Cameron Beccario

A Lovely Animation of the Planet's Hot-Weather 'Misery'

Where in the world is it unbearably hot right now?

La Crosse NWS

Wisconsin Is Getting Smothered by Millions of Gross, Horny Flies

Close your mouth while looking at these photos, or a bug might fly in.

jordache/Shutterstock.com

Can a Co-Op Incentive Model Save Europe's Real Estate Market?

Ireland's Dublin House program will give groups of residents great plots for cheap if they commit to developing them and living in what they build.

waltarrrrr/Flickr

The Forgotten History of L.A.'s Failed Freeway Revolt

The story of Boyle Heights reminds us that urban highway teardowns don't always end in victory.

The Atlantic

The Remote Warehouse Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government repository reveals a global industry of plant and animal trafficking.

Mark Byrnes

Saving Sam the Record Man's Giant Spinning Discs

A huge flashing sign from a shuttered record store in Toronto gets a new home after a lengthy preservation battle.

Flickr/Phillip Capper

Geography Plays a Role in Whether People Believe in Climate Change

Those who live near the coast are more likely to think climate change is real.

dibrova/Shutterstock.com

Wealthy New Yorkers Can't Afford to Move

People leave the city for many reasons. But the richest don't stray far.

The Brooklyn Bridge Has Always Been a Magnet for Mystery

First a grand piano showed up underneath it, then two white flags appeared on top of it. Why does the Brooklyn Bridge attract so many enigmas?

Elizabeth Cline

Where Does Discarded Clothing Go?

Americans send 10.5 million tons of clothing to landfills every year. Can for-profit recycling companies turn those rags into riches?

Reuters/Bobby Yip

Asia's Richest Man Is Building Hong Kong Apartments Barely Bigger Than a Prison Cell

At $250,000, these 200-square-foot studios are among Hong Kong's most affordable.

Lego.com

Why Are All These Legos Washing Up on the Beach?

A rogue wave and a lot of plastic octopi shed light on the workings of ocean currents.