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Goodnight to Night Trains?

For long-distance travelers looking for low-emissions options, choices are shrinking as Europe's overnight trains fade away.

Texas State Library and Archives

New Podcast: Kriston Capps on 'The Architecture of American Literacy'

Download or stream the conversation on the architectural and social legacy of Andrew Carnegie's libraries.

Tony Deary

'Marathon Tourism' in Asia Speeds Up

"Sports travel" has hit Asia in a big way, but will Western runners want to trek through Beijing's smog?

Alexia Fernández Campbell

Is New Orleans Trying to Deport Undocumented Workers Now That the Rebuilding Is Over?

Federal contractors lured undocumented immigrants to New Orleans after Katrina with loosened labor laws. Now the city's Latinos want police and immigration agents to stop harassing them.

How Andrew Carnegie Built the Architecture of American Literacy

The philanthropist covered the U.S. in libraries between 1893 and 1919. How many survive—and the forms they've taken—points to what kind of structures make a city center.

Art Market Budapest

Budapest's Newest Public Art Is a Humongous, Yelling Man

What city wouldn't want to have a furious stone giant ready to rampage through its streets?

Oliver O'Brien

Mapping London's 'Tube Tongues'

An interactive map shows what languages—apart from English—are most spoken at each underground stop.

Reuters/Yuya Shino

Windowless Planes Could Be Here In 10 Years, and They Look Amazing

...Or terrifying, if you're not fond of flying.

@stlouis_j

In Protests, Who Owns the Highways?

Whose streets? Our streets. But more than rush hour is disrupted when people take to the highways.

AP Photo/Scott Anger

How Many Houses Can You Buy in Other Cities for the Price of One in Silicon Valley?

Abandon the tech hub for Youngstown, Ohio, and you could find yourself with 11 homes for the price of one.

Wikimedia Commons

Happy Birthday, New York City Subway!

Today in 1904, NYC opened its first underground line, inspiring the biggest building boom in city history—and a spoof by Thomas Edison.

California High-Speed Rail

Moving Forward with America's High-Speed Rail Projects

A status report on proposed lines in California, Texas, and the Northeast.

Alex Brandon/AP

Standing Up for the Vietnamese Community of New Orleans

Minh Nguyen campaigned for environmental justice in his community after Katrina. In the years since, he and his group VAYLA have expanded their mission.

Symbolia

Drawing Attention to Chicago's Anti-Homeless Measures With 'Compartment 13'

Chicago has constructed sloped barriers beneath the Kedzie Underpass to force out Lazarus Alcazar and other homeless men and women. This comic tells his story.

Your U-Lock Is Basically Worthless, but Don't Worry

Thieves can quickly pop open the lock with a car jack or pipe, but there are ways to protect yourself.

Wikimedia Commons

How Does a Building Become Sacred? Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Harris & Ewing/LOC

How Did Baseball Fans Watch the World Series Before TV?

From the Play-O-Graph to the Jackson Manikin Baseball Indicator, the forgotten history of simulated ballgames.

oopsmark

Who Needs a Boring Closet When You Have a Grappling Hook?

Stop tossing your entire wardrobe over a chair and get organized with the "Grapple Clothing Hook."

Graffiti Artist 'Creepytings' Is Defacing National Parks

As long as National Park Service budgets shrink, vandalism is going to be a feature of our favorite natural spaces.