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Blitzortung

Crowdsourcing Lightning Strikes Actually Works Pretty Well

A Dusseldorf-based network has linked more than 800 low-priced lightning detectors around the globe.

Keith Barry

What I Learned Riding One of Those New Private City Buses

Bridj won't compete with Boston public transit, but it could get some commuters of out their cars.

ManServants

The 'ManServants' Startup Is Not for Sex, but It Should Be

ManServants is billing itself as an Uber-like service for cabana boys. In a better world, it would work even more like Uber, and it would work for sex.

I Quant NY

Graphing New Yorkers' Lives Through the Open Data Portal

The I Quant NY blog mines NYC's massive data clearinghouse to visualize issues facing city dwellers, from education to eating.

Kyler Zeleny

Documenting the Sparsely Populated Canadian West

A "visual sociologist" photographs dozens of small towns and their struggle to stay relevant in the 21st century.

Mark Plummer/Flickr

Requiem for a Nightmare

The fate of the FBI's J. Edgar Hoover Building—maybe the most despised structure in Washington, D.C.—is virtually sealed. As Brutalism edges toward extinction, cities should take stock.

Associated Press

UCLA Is Recovering From a 10-Million-Gallon Flood

In the middle of California's terrible drought, students boogie-boarded their way through a massive water-main break yesterday.

Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Why the Mets Are Right to Save the New York State Pavilion

With change in Queens arriving rapidly, the Mets can preserve a piece of team history—and public good will—by helping to restore a part of the World's Fair from 50 years ago.

Jos Dielis/Flickr

Why Seville Is Banning Outdoor Domino Games

The city is rolling out several new noise-muffling measures, but the real problem may be the way Spanish cities are constructed. 

Courtesy Ken Foster

How a Michigan Family's Home Became a One-Deer Preserve

A heartwarming story of sensible local government intervention. 

Julian Melchiorri/Dezeen

Could This Lovely Synthetic Leaf Solve our Carbon Woes?

The notion is awesome, but the science behind it might not be.

Greensboro Historical Museum

Could Silicon Valley Become the Next Camden, New Jersey?

From phonographs to smartphones, no technology—or industry—is immune to change.

The Port Authority Thinks It Owns the New York City Skyline

A small NYC shop received a cease and desist letter from the agency over a popular "212" dishware line featuring the Twin Towers.

James Fremont/Flickr

What Congress Should Be Talking About When It Talks About a National Transportation Plan

There's a worthy federal infrastructure program staring America right in the face: broadband.

Thomas Leuthard/Flickr

Stockholm Is Crowdsourcing the Color of Its New Subway Line

To enter the contest, you also have to justify your choice.

Climate Central

How Much Hotter Will Your City Be in 2100?

An interactive map shows the predicted high temperatures in 1,001 U.S. cities and towns.

Eric Thayer/Reuters

How Much Cleaning Up Brownfields Is Really Worth

A new study shows the enormous effect that the EPA's brownfield remediation program has on real estate values in cities.

trevor.patt/Flickr

Apartment Residents Feel Unsafe in Their Neighborhoods, But Cozy Indoors

Those living in stand-alone homes feel just the opposite.

Glen Stubbe /Star Tribune/ZUMA Press

This Huge Corporation Is Tackling Climate Change—Because It's a Threat to the Bottom Line

Food giant General Mills now has some pretty sweet eco-bragging rights.