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Mark Jenkins

Kyoto Can Teach the D.C. Metro a Lesson About Express Tracks

Some of Japan's best rail is fast, flexible—and doesn't use express tracks. D.C.'s Silver Line doesn't need them, either.

Reuters/Brodsky Development

The Next Housing Crisis May Be Sooner Than You Think

How we could fall into another housing crisis before we've fully pulled out of the 2008 one.

National Journal

Psycholitics: The Science of Why You Vote the Way You Do

Voter choices are swayed by things much more obtuse than actual information.

Mark Byrnes/CityLab

Moving Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Cities

A popular new study claims to lump cities into four types. But the real science of cities is heading toward a more complex understanding of how urban spaces evolve.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How Tech Is Getting Young Voters to Turn Out for Election Day

This hasn’t been the most exciting election season. But a mobile and online push is helping get youth out to polls.

Landcarpets

These 'Landcarpets' Are Modeled on Satellite Imagery

And you can have one customized for your location, too.

StacieStauffSmith Photos/Shutterstock.com

Will New Yorkers Warm Up to a New 25-Mile-Per-Hour Speed Limit?

As NYC makes serious changes to reduce pedestrian traffic deaths, some New Yorkers resist out of romance for the city's chaotic streets.

Wide Path Camper

Pedal Away From It All—With an Ultralight Camper Trailer Attached

Wide Path Campers make bike-camping more accessible (and comfortable).

Matthew Fern / Flickr

The Economic Case for a National Per-Mile Driving Fee

It could generate more revenue than we know what to do with—not a bad problem to have.

Toa55/Shutterstock.com

As Boomers Age, Walkable Cities Become More Important

Millennials and older Americans agree on city accessibility, and the lobbying powerhouse of the AARP is emerging as a key advocate.

The Durst Organization

The Failure of One World Trade Center

At some point, the building gave up on making any comment whatsoever.

pisaphotography/Shutterstock.com

Could Free Public Transit Get Americans to Voting Booths?

Barely half of American voters are turning out at the polls. Could free transit engage communities?

Peter Kim/Shutterstock.com

Legal Weed Is Expected to Pass in D.C.—How Many Ways Can Congress Interfere?

This Election Day brings another high-profile chance for District voters to have their voices ignored.

MSPF

San Francisco Plans to Produce More Fog to Build Community Spirit

The Market Street Prototyping Festival will bring a giant dining room, a roving selfie machine, and other wackiness to the city.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The FBI Wants to Ramp Up Access to Your iPhone

The agency argues that encryption is making it difficult for police to catch dangerous criminals.

Somebody App

Even Miranda July's Weird Stranger-Interaction App Can't Connect Us

The artist's Somebody app aims to bring people who are geographically close together socially. It hasn't worked.

Flickr/universityofpennsylvania

How Anchor Institutions like Hospitals and Universities Can Help Cities

They've got a permanent presence—and great hiring and purchasing potential.

REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Tracing the Scattered Pieces of the Berlin Wall: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Flickr/Miguel Angel Nunez

L.A. Is Getting Its Third Pro Soccer Team. Will the City Finally Build a Stadium?

L.A. soccer fans are tired of schlepping to the suburbs.