All Articles

AP/Cliff Owen

Testing a No-Cellphone Sidewalk Lane

A new National Geographic TV series captures pedestrians navigating—and ignoring—signs indicating a cell-free zone. 

Tim Adams/Flickr

The Atlanta Transit Agency's Big Plan to Convert Parking Lots into Housing

MARTA sees real estate as a gateway to better train and bus service.

Reuters/Suzanne Plunkett

U.K. Supermarket Giant Tesco Wants to Get Into the Housing Game

Don't forget to drop off your rent check on aisle 12.

Sarah Goodyear

In Defense of Urban Wild Space in Miami

A Walmart and a Chick-fil-A could replace some of the last remaining pine rocklands in the world. 

psoundphoto/shutterstock.com

Where We'll Camp When We Return to the Moon

We will go back. And researchers have discovered pits that could provide great shelter. 

Reuters/Robert Galbraith

Cost of Living Is Really All About Housing

Places where the rent really is too damn high.

Max Roberts

A Vignelli-Inspired Map Designed to Make the Least Amount of People Mad

One designer thinks his version of the notorious 1972 subway map wouldn't bother as many New Yorkers.

Sam Beebe/Flickr

A Detroit Suburb Attempts to Sneakily Gate Itself Off

Grosse Pointe Park has put up a massive barn at its city limits—and its not the first structure that blocks a route through the border.

spirit of america/Shutterstock.com

Rethinking the Palm Trees of Los Angeles: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

AP Images/Juan Karita

Quinoa Isn't the Only Ancient Crop Swept Up by the Western Gluten-Free Craze

Teff, fonio, and amaranth may be the supergrains of the future.

Reuters/Gustau Nacarino

How Barcelona and Philadelphia Are Turning Procurement Upside Down

These cities aren't telling contractors what they want to buy. They're laying out problems they want to fix.

Radio Diaries

Portraits of Jobs That No Longer Exist

More than a decade ago, Radio Diaries chronicled the lives of people in old-school industries. Today, their voices bring back a city that's long gone.

Re-Collective

A Doomed Seattle Freeway Ramp Gets a Loving Goodbye

Artists transform a highway ramp that over the years has welcomed skateboarders, divers, hermits, and marriage-seekers.

IAFSS/European Platform Against Windfarms

Wind Farm Fires Are Much More Common Than We Thought

And they're underreported by as much as 10 times, according to new research.

vxla/Flickr

Why Amtrak's On-Time Performance Is So Much Worse This Year

The passenger rail carrier lost its leverage with freight rail companies after a federal appeals court ruling in 2013.

Sam Dosick/Flickr

Does Your Bike-Share System Have a Theme Song?

Changwon, South Korea's does. Get ready to be jealous. 

D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities

D.C. Sinks an Artist's Plan to Build a Sunken Gas Station in the Anacostia River

A proposal by Canadian artist Mia Feuer to build a replica of a submerged gas station in the Anacostia has finally found what any good public art project needs: a vocal opposition.

Richard Huppertz/Wikimedia Commons

Remembering Pittsburgh's Most Mesmerizing Sign

In a city filled with illuminated signs, Westinghouse's light show was the one to watch for 30 years. Nostalgia for it remains.

Sean Gardner/Reuters

New Orleans Transit Never Recovered After Katrina

New Orleans' population has rebounded since the devastating 2005 hurricane, but public transportation is still a mess—especially for the poor.