All Articles

The Sequester Is Hitting the Country's Neediest Students the Hardest

Children from poor families and special needs kids are disproportionately impacted by the cuts.

A Pair of Nuts Fly Through Rio de Janeiro's Vertical Labyrinth

Extreme-sports enthusiasts Jokke Sommer and Ludovic Woerth take a hair-raising ride through Brazil's urban jungle.

Why We Just Might Want to Build Skyscrapers Out of Wood

Vancouver-based architect Michael Green is trying to convince the world to construct tall wood buildings.

And the Cities Most in Danger of a Super-Flu Outbreak Are...

Researchers say lethal strains of influenza are most likely to arise next in coastal China, the Nile Delta and elsewhere.

The Economic Case for Rail Subsidies

Service increases may pay for themselves through emissions reductions and safety improvements, even before factoring in congestion.

It's Not Just Overflow—Everyday Leaks From Sewer Systems Lead to Alarming Amounts of Sewage in Our Waterways

And you probably can't even smell it.

Daylight Saving and Crime: The Best #CityReads of the Week

Our weekly roundup of the most intriguing articles about cities and urbanism we've come across in the past seven days.

Best U.S. Cities for St. Patrick's Day? Anywhere But Texas

The Northeast Corridor is, unsurprisingly, the promised land of Irish bars and restaurants.

Promising Film Trailer of the Day: 'Sign Painters'

A city is only as good as its signs.

La Vita è Mortadella: A Day in the Life of an Italian Deli

"If ya don't see it, we don't have it."

Woman Files Suit Alleging She Was Arrested for Criticizing 'Stop and Frisk'

The NYPD's aggressive policy has come under increased scrutiny in recent months.

Shanghai's Spectacular Growth, in One Photo

You don't need satellite imagery to see how much the city has changed.

Inside a Hindu Widow Community

Roughly 100 miles from New Delhi, widowed women live together in the Meera Sahavagini ashram.

Happy 200th Birthday to a Mapmaker Who Changed the World

John Snow mapped out cases of cholera during an infamous 1854 outbreak in London.

If Only All Subway Sandwich Shops Were Actual Subway Stations

Baltimore gets an edible fantasy transit system.

There's a Lot More Skeletons Where These Came From

Modern London was built on top of a large number of plague pits, and the city's thirst for more space means digging won't slow down any time soon.

Mass Transit Use Isn't Up Everywhere

Public transportation ridership is up across the U.S., but the opposite is true in many cities that voted down funding measures last year.

'Femme Fatales of Cartography'

Inside a beautiful new collection of "maps you shouldn't trust yet cannot help but fall for."

Is There a Link Between Walkability and Local School Performance?

Some early attempts to map the question in D.C. suggest that there might be. But what does the correlation tell us?