Next Economy

Reuters/Eric Miller

Minneapolis's White Lie

Despite being applauded by many, the "miraculous" prosperity of the Twin Cities is only a reality for a certain slice of their population.

Flickr/pixonomy

How Much Do Waiters Really Earn in Tips?

Gratuities, often paid in cash, are hard to track. A new report sheds light on an estimated $11 billion of annual unreported income.

Reuters/Mark Blinch

The Richest Cities for Young People: 1980 vs. Today

History often intervenes with extrapolated trends, making it hard to predict what the best cities for young people will be in the future.

Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach

Where Have All the Construction Workers Gone?

Nevada now employs 60 percent fewer construction workers than it did during the housing boom. Some found new careers. Others left the country.

Reuters/Mario Anzuoni

A Better Way to Help the Long-Term Unemployed

One successful program pays for an intensive training class, subsidizes wages for the jobless, and has an 80 percent placement rate. Can it be scaled?

Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Where Did All the Retail Jobs Go?

Since 2007, the private sector has added 2.4 million new jobs. Retail has lost 60,000.

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

The Rich Get Richer—and More Educated

Wealthy Americans have seen major growth when it comes to educational attainment, but the poorest Americans still struggle to graduate.

Reuters

Is Ending Segregation the Key to Ending Poverty?

Chicago's experiment in relocating poor African American families to rich white suburbs seems to be a success. So why are so few other cities doing the same?

Flickr/Melissa Johnson

Rural America's Silent Housing Crisis

Accounting for only 20 percent of the population, residents of more isolated areas struggle to find a safe, affordable place to live—and to make anyone else care.

AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File

The Uber Economy

Is the company destroying full-time work, entrenching us in part-time purgatory, or empowering America's most independent workers?

Alana Semuels

Should Urban Universities Help Their Neighbors?

The housing crisis decimated communities near the University of Chicago, now the school and other organizations are trying to stabilize them.

Rick Wilking/Reuters

Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State?

Debates over wage-requirements are common at the federal and state level, but more municipalities are joining the conversation in an attempt to address variations in the cost of living.

City of Covington Planning and Zoning Department

What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood

Covington, Georgia, decided not to let a half-completed development sit empty. But the city's solution has been both praised and vilified by observers.

Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market?

While some remain cynical about homeownership, the U.S.'s foreign-born population still regards it as a symbol of attaining the American Dream.

Alana Semuels

Why the Poor Are Struggling in America's Suburbs

The 'burbs are home to an increasing number of poor families. But it may prove more difficult to make it there than in cities.

SkiStar/Flickr

In the Search for Affordable Childcare, Location Is Everything

The cost of center-based services for children varies widely throughout the U.S., and so can the availability of financial assistance for low-income families.

Robert Galbraith/Reuters

The City That Gave Its Residents $3 Million

Vallejo, California, residents were initially psyched to spend tax dollars on their pet projects. But things haven't turned out as they had hoped.

Fawn Johnson

Why Denver's Housing Crunch Might Cost the City Its Millennials

The rental market is tightening and paths to home ownership are few in the now-hip city.

David McNew/Getty Images

Looking to Fund a Clean Energy Project? You Need a Green Bank

New state-run investment funds could create a real marketplace for alternative energy projects—and bring down costs for all of us.