Next Economy

A New Life for Dead Malls

Developers have had to get creative when it comes to salvaging America's failing shopping centers, turning them into hospitals, churches, and even parks.

The Puzzling Geography of Workers' Compensation

In Pennsylvania, losing an eye on the job warrants as much as $261,525. In Alabama, it can only get you $27,280.

What 27 Weeks of Unemployment Does to the American Worker

Though the economy is improving, a third of those still looking for work have been jobless for more than six months.

When the Path to Homeownership Runs Through Public Housing

A federal government program is trying to turn our nation of low-income renters into future homeowners by helping them build up savings accounts.

$350 Million Might Not Be Enough to Save Las Vegas

Spending millions to revitalize a struggling portion of the city might seem like a good bet, but the current effort led by a billionaire CEO is facing major challenges.

A Farewell to Mallrats

Malls around the country are closing, leaving teens with one fewer place to just be.

This Start-Up Helps Freelancers Get Mortgages

Privlo wants to become the go-to lender for the self-employed and others whose incomes aren't tied to traditional jobs.

Why the Gap Between Worker Pay and Productivity Is So Problematic

Labor has become more efficient and profitable, but employees aren't sharing in the benefits.

How 14,000 Workers Managed to Slow Down the Entire Economy

Longshoremen play an indispensable role in getting 90 percent of consumer goods into the country—and they know how to use that to their advantage.

Why Are Developers Still Building Sprawl?

Boomers and Millennials say they want to live in compact, walkable developments, but builders are putting their money into suburban McMansions.

Minneapolis's White Lie

Despite being applauded by many, the "miraculous" prosperity of the Twin Cities is only a reality for a certain slice of their population.

How Much Do Waiters Really Earn in Tips?

Gratuities, often paid in cash, are hard to track. A new report sheds light on an estimated $11 billion of annual unreported income.

The Richest Cities for Young People: 1980 vs. Today

History often intervenes with extrapolated trends, making it hard to predict what the best cities for young people will be in the future.

Where Have All the Construction Workers Gone?

Nevada now employs 60 percent fewer construction workers than it did during the housing boom. Some found new careers. Others left the country.

A Better Way to Help the Long-Term Unemployed

One successful program pays for an intensive training class, subsidizes wages for the jobless, and has an 80 percent placement rate. Can it be scaled?

Where Did All the Retail Jobs Go?

Since 2007, the private sector has added 2.4 million new jobs. Retail has lost 60,000.

The Rich Get Richer—and More Educated

Wealthy Americans have seen major growth when it comes to educational attainment, but the poorest Americans still struggle to graduate.

Is Ending Segregation the Key to Ending Poverty?

Chicago's experiment in relocating poor African American families to rich white suburbs seems to be a success. So why are so few other cities doing the same?

Rural America's Silent Housing Crisis

Accounting for only 20 percent of the population, residents of more isolated areas struggle to find a safe, affordable place to live—and to make anyone else care.