History

D.C.'s Panic and Fear the Day Before the March on Washington

Memories from history's wild imagination, 50 years later.

The Unsteady Rise of Minority Civil Servants

Where public payrolls still don't reflect the local population.

Mapping a Century of Change in the City of Boston

Dating back to the 1890s.

The Incredible, Explosive Growth of Chicago, As Seen Through Its Maps

See the first-ever map of the city, and how it evolved over a century.

Baltimore, Then and Now (1911 to 2013)

A peek at how the city's changed on its 284th birthday.

The Original New York Street Photographer

If Alice Austen weren't a real person, some novelist might have had to invent her.

The Time the Teacher's Union Saved New York From Bankruptcy

In October 1975, only the whims of a union leader separated the city from default.

The Most Sophisticated Flickr Maps We've Ever Seen

Telling encoded stories of politics, natural disasters and social movements.

Animated Retrospectives of the Day: Watch Iconic Skylines Emerge Before Your Eyes

Corporate real estate data offer unexpectedly riveting views into the past. 

Maybe Bowling Alone Isn't So Bad After All

How clubs and community choirs may have contributed to the rise of Nazi Germany.

Happy Reopening, Statue of Liberty! We've Been Making a Big Deal Out of You Since 1885

In honor of $59 million worth of repairs following Superstorm Sandy, a look back at the initial excitement surrounding America's most famous statue.

A Charming Look Back at the Opening of the 91-Year-Old Lincoln Memorial

"This memorial is less for Abraham Lincoln than for those of us today and for those who follow after."

Lewis and Clark, Meet Foursquare

History's greatest journeys, now available in KML files.

A Funeral Car Named 'Descanso,' or, When Death Rode the Rails in America

In the first decades of the 20th century, if you died in a city, you may have traveled toward your final resting place via public transit.

Stepping Up to Restore Cincinnati's Neglected Pedestrian Stairways

The city says it can't afford to maintain them. Can private citizens make up the difference?

In 1894, the 'New Woman' Was a Bicyclist Who Changed History

A documentary details the story of Annie "Londonderry" Kopchovsky, who rode around the world on two wheels in 15 months.

The Simple Philosophy Behind St. Louis's Spectacular Central Library Renovation

In short: The books should be more prominent than ever.

Why Are There Still So Many Train Stations Named Penn Station?

The Pennsylvania Railroad isn't coming through that tunnel — so how come we keep going through its doors?

The Strange Decline of the Philly Accent

Linguists are still trying to understand the surprising evolution of how Philadelphians speak.