HOT lanes

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Putting a Price on D.C.'s Worst Commute

I-95 south of the nation's capital has some of the worst traffic in the country. Next year, you'll be able to buy your way out of it.

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Raising Fares Is Not the Only Way to Fund Public Transportation

Seventeen alternatives, ranked.

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HOT Lanes Are Even More Popular When They're Expensive

A new study finds that drivers are willing to pay anywhere between $60 to $120 for every hour of time saved.

Reuters

Finally, a Plan to Pay for Public Transit With Highway Tolls

In Tampa, an innovative idea called "bus toll lanes" could pad the farebox with road revenue.

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What If You Could Reserve Your Daily Commute Like a Table at a Restaurant?

It's not as crazy as it might sound.

Florida Department of Transportation

Why Are HOT Lanes Struggling to Make Money?

Broadly speaking, the answer comes down to poor planning and a commuter learning curve.

Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments

Road Fees Don't Hurt the Poor as Much as You Might Think

They satisfy a "Do No Harm" approach to transportation planning, and they're less pernicious than sales tax measures.

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Congestion Pricing's Enduring Public Perception Problem

The need for better awareness about traffic strategies is quite clear.

DC's Massive New Transportation Experiment Starts Tomorrow

High-tech high-occupancy tolls come to the nation's capital. Is this the future of highway infrastructure?

Reuters

A Lukewarm Report Card for High-Occupancy Toll Lanes

These roadways have performed well by some traffic standards, but problems remain.