Lawsuits

Flickr/MoBikeFed

People Love (to Sue) Rails-to-Trails Projects

The federal government has paid $49 million in claims in the past year alone.

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How Little Things Add Up to Keep Homeless Kids From School

Baltimore's neediest students often struggle to find transportation and afford things like uniforms.

Reuters

Transit Agencies Are Finally Fighting Back Against an Infamous Patent Troll

The American Public Transportation Association has filed a lawsuit to halt "frivolous" cases brought by a mysterious company based in Luxembourg.

via arnesvenson.com

If a Photographer Takes a Picture of You Through Your Apartment Window, Is it Art?

A lawsuit against Arne Svenson, who captured unwitting subjects through their windows, could draw an important line between art and intrusion.

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Domestic Violence Survivors Who Call the Cops Risk Eviction in Some Places

Some cities require landlords to evict tenants who call 911 3 times within 4 months. The rule puts women in grave danger.

Reuters

Gas Shortage Underscores NYC's Move Away From Hybrid Cabs

A taxi lobby has fought the city's efforts toward a fuel-efficient fleet — and won.

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Londoners Go To Court Over Olympics Missiles

Residents of an East London apartment tower are hoping the legal system will save them from having to host missiles on their roof during the Olympics.

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Newcastle, Australia: World Capital of Tree Drama

For the second time in less than a year, this seaside community is in an uproar over something to do with trees.

Reuters

Is the Biker Rights Movement Gaining Momentum?

A new anti-harassment law in Berkeley and a building-access law in San Francisco are both the second of their kind.

Reuters

L.A.'s $1.5 Billion Sidewalk Problem

Sidewalk disrepair and inaccessibility are the subject of new lawsuits against the city.

Reuters

How Should Metros Respond to Emergencies?

NYC subway riders trapped on A train last winter sue the city for a "policy that will benefit the public now and for years to come"

Reuters

Fixing a City by Dividing It Up

Escondido is almost half Latino, but has elected only one Hispanic city councilman in 120 years. A new lawsuit aims to change that