Psychology

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Is Civic Virtue Universal?

Not all cultures agree on what it means to be generous.

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How You Cross the Street Largely Depends on Where You're From

French pedestrians take more "risks" at crosswalks than the Japanese, says a new study.

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There's a Good Reason We're Anxious About Expanding Subway Cell Service

People have an especially hard time ignoring half a conversation because we can't predict what's coming next.

Posters of Angry Eyes Actually Scare Off Bike Thieves

A British experiment showed that images of eyes reduced the amount of stolen bikes in certain locations by 62 percent.

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Resilience Does Tend to Follow Horror

If there's an uplifting lesson from Boston, it may be the many people who will overcome the trauma of tragedy.

Is Google Maps Changing Our Behavior?

For better or worse, people sacrifice spatial orientation for convenience.

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What We Can Learn From the Brain Waves of Pedestrians

Enter the brave new world of mobile EEG.

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How We Feel About a Billboard Can Impact Our Driving

But not exactly in the way you might think.

Bike Maps That Give Riders the Info They Actually Need

In Austin, maps are color-coded by comfort level rather than traffic-engineering standards.

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Why People Choose Cars, Even When Mass Transit Would Serve Them Better

The "car effect" explains why so many people choose to drive even when it's not in their best interest.

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Voice-Operated Texting While Driving: As Unsafe As It Ever Was

A new California law says drivers can text and email via voice systems safely — but the evidence begs to differ.

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Why Would Rural and Big City Kids Be Similarly Underprepared for Kindergarten?

They're both lagging behind their suburban and small city counterparts, according to new research.

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Even American Drivers Like Mass Transit More Than They Think

A quarter of car commuters gave up their parking permits after a recent trial in Boston.

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An Indirect Damage of Terror Attacks: Higher Traffic Fatalities

New research suggests people drive more after transit is targeted, even though the choice actually elevates their safety risk.

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Residential Mobility Changes the Way You Make Friends

A new study finds that moving a lot leads to loneliness — but also leads us to expand our social networks.

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The Emerging Link Between Cities, Stress, and Psychosis

A growing line of research may ultimately help us design healthier cities.

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Compelling Evidence That Red-Light Cameras Do Make Roads Safer

In this ongoing debate, a new study finds that as red-light cameras go dark, red light running goes up — immediately.

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The Surprising Economics of Sex Ratios

New research says men change their spending habits when they outnumber women.

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How Urban Parks Enhance Your Brain, Part 2

The less city you can see through the trees, the better for your brain, new research suggests.