Weather

David McNew/Getty Image

Instead of Data, Scientists Share Their Feelings on Climate Change

Scientists are publishing emotional letters about the threat of climate change, hoping to engage the public on a new website.

Theodore Allen

How to Track Climate Change? Digitize a Century's Worth of Moldy Old Records

Scientists are embarking on data rescue missions all over the world to find and save old climate information. 

SkyTruth

Watch Six Months of Fracking Fires Blaze Across the Country

Massive fires light up the sky in U.S. states at the center of a fracking boom.

Flickr/woodleywonderworks

Drought Is Causing the Western U.S. to Rise Like an Uncoiling Spring

The massive loss of groundwater has caused a tectonic uplift of more than half an inch in some areas.

Oddur Sigurdsson/Smithsonian

Visualizing the Shaking Rage of Iceland's Bardarbunga Volcano

This is what a swarm of earthquakes looks like underneath the massive stratovolcano.

Elizabeth Lowe

The Urban Environment Is Creating Super-Sized Spiders

It's helping them spawn tons of spider eggs, too.

Videos
Flickr/*suika *

Why the World Smells Different After It Rains

Behold, the wonders of petrichor.

Chris Linder/University of Washington

The Arctic Is Losing an Alarming Amount of Snow

Snow depth on sea ice has fallen by as much as half in the past 50 years.

Photos
NASA

Help Science Identify a Kajillion Astronaut Photos of Cities

"Night Cities" is an ambitious project to create an atlas of urban space photography.

Reuters

Why Bottled Water Comes From California, Which Can't Spare Much

Dasani, Aquafina, and Crystal Geyser all dip into the Golden State's limited supply.

John Fowler

Tonight's Perseid Meteor Shower Should Be Visible in Even the Most Light-Polluted Cities

The best shower of the year is known for its intense, colorful "fireballs."

Californians Will Have to Get Comfortable With Purified 'Toilet-to-Tap' Water

The golden state's historic drought is forcing residents to reconsider the "yuck factor" of wastewater re-use.

Desmond Boylan/Reuters

How Much Do Hurricanes Hurt the Economy?

Climate-change researchers say the idea that weather disasters can improve infrastructure through "creative destruction" is a myth, and project that future storms may run the planet nearly $10 trillion.

Photos
James Haseltine/Oregon Air National Guard

The Drought-Ravaged West Sprouts a Massive Pyrocumulus

This stunning cloud was caused by updrafts from wildfires.

AllieKF/Flickr

What We Don't Know About What's Going on With Bugs Should Worry Us

A big drop-off in invertebrate populations could spell trouble for cities, where the important roles that insects play are still poorly understood.

AP/Elise Amendola

The Tornado That Didn't Wreck Enough to Warrant Federal Aid

A Massachusetts city is denied FEMA assistance after being blindsided by a twister that did major damage—but not quite enough.

Dan/Wikimedia

Gelatinous Sea Creatures Storm San Francisco

Squishy, intergalactic-looking "hydroid polyps" have washed up on beaches by the thousands.

Maps
Blitzortung

Crowdsourcing Lightning Strikes Actually Works Pretty Well

A Dusseldorf-based network has linked more than 800 low-priced lightning detectors around the globe.

Climate Central

How Much Hotter Will Your City Be in 2100?

An interactive map shows the predicted high temperatures in 1,001 U.S. cities and towns.