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Illegal!

A New Magazine Helps Addicts Fund Their Addictions—Legally

Illegal! magazine allows its vendors to keep sales profits so they can buy drugs rather than stealing to fund their habits.  

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why More Northeast U.S. Travelers Take the Train Instead of a Plane, in 2 Charts

In-vehicle travel time is more productive and less stressful travel time.

Courtesy Zachary Caceres

How Local Governments Could Work More Like Cell Phones

A young American in Guatemala wants to bring a spirit of entrepreneurship to municipal governance through his think tank, the Startup Cities Institute.

Christos Georghiou/Shutterstock.com

Predict Your Date of Death With This Gloomy Data Visualization

This World Bank-supported project asks, "What's my place in the world population? How long will I live?"

AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

The World's First Marijuana Credit Union Will Open in January

Thanks to an overlooked law, Colorado's legal pot enterprises will finally get the legitimate banking services they need. But discord with the feds still casts a shadow over the industry.

CityFixer
Jason Lawrence / Flickr

How Super-Small, European-Style Delivery Vehicles Could Make U.S. Streets Safer

A growing class of cargo vans enables smarter intersection design.

Wkimedia Commons

Choose One, Millennials: Upward Mobility or Affordable Housing

The paradox of the American Dream: The best cities to get ahead are often the most expensive places to live, and the most affordable places to live can be the worst cities to get ahead.

Maps
Esteban Moro and colleagues

What Twitter Can Tell Us About Unemployment

Where, when, and how people tweet reveals information about the socioeconomics of a region.

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Kentucky Hopes You'll Eat Its Invasive Carp

If you can't beat 'em, eat 'em?

Anna Valmero

How One Manila Company Is Helping Female Entrepreneurs Modernize a Traditional Business

Sari-sari stores are ubiquitous in Philippine cities, and nearly all of them are owned by women—who are now bringing their businesses into the future.

Hank Shiffman/Shutterstock

Why Gas-Station Restaurants Are Great for Suburbs

A new crop of restaurants in gas stations, like Seoul Food D.C., will help suburbs grow into more authentic urban places.

Ted Eytan/Flickr

Meet the Few African-American Owners in D.C.'s Bar Boom

The revamped H Street corridor in Northeast D.C. has become a profitable place for African Americans to open bars. But they face more hurdles to getting a business running than the area's mostly white newcomers.

Dan Glass

Risking Life, Limb, and Waterborne Parasites for 'Trespass Theater'

A true tale featuring secret meeting spots, cops, a knapsack full of iPhones, and a live performance that floated down New York's Gowanus Canal.

Videos

Gentrification 'Without the Negative' in Columbus, Ohio

A local arts group moved into an abandoned factory. What does it mean for the surrounding neighborhood?

Maps
Library Of Congress

What We Can Learn From a Vintage Visualization of Global Migration

A French archival map represents global migration circa 1858 in strikingly similar ways to how researchers do it today.

keystricken/Flickr

A Toast to John Shields, Who Made Every Trader Joe's Feel Like Home

As the West Coast chain went national in the '90s, the former CEO—who died recently at 82—went to great lengths to infuse local influence into each new store.

U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

The Fall and (Partial) Rise of the Rural Creative Class

The rural creative class has recovered from the recession like its urban counterparts—but it’s how and where that matters.

Egg-Freezing Parties Aren't Going Away Any Time Soon

They've jumped from Manhattan to the West Coast. How much farther might they spread?

Patrick Coulie

An Etsy Co-Founder and His Wife Have Big Plans for Albuquerque

From a digital fabrication startup to green buildings, Jared and Laurie Tarbell are trying to make downtown a hotbed of innovation.