Work

Patrick Semansky/AP

Burned Out? Take a Sabbatical

In 2009, the U.S. Navy started offering a career break to help retain service members. Now the other armed forces—and private companies—are following suit.

Srdjan Zivulovic/Reuters

The Fading Dream of a Borderless Europe

Six states in Europe’s normally passport-free Schengen Area have brought back passport controls. So what’s coming next?

David Ryder/Reuters

The 5 Kinds of Cities We'll See in the Populist Era

Will your city go into triage mode, double down on progressive policies, or flex its financial muscle in 2017?

lee/Flickr

What Trans Men Know About Gender in the Workplace

Want to see how men and women fare differently at work? Change gender.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

How Norwegians and Americans See Inequality Differently

According to a recent study, the former are much less comfortable with luck determining well-being.

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

How Clearing Criminal Records Puts People to Work

About 70 million Americans have criminal records, and some of them struggle to find jobs decades after their offense. Advocates of expungement say it levels the playing field—and boosts the economy.

Fred Prouser/Reuters

In Job Training, a Little Support Can Go a Long Way

Help with navigating everyday challenges—like housing, transportation, and child care—can be key to completing job training, a new report finds.

Ryan Foley/AP

Paying Rent With Words

Departing from a focus on pure craft, more schools are helping students learn how to turn a profit.

Manu Fernandez/AP

Mark Zuckerberg Is Touring America. He Should Start With San Francisco

The Facebook founder wants to get out and see more of America in 2017. He should think more carefully about his own back yard.

Benoit Tessier/Reuters

Why Virtual Reality May Become Part of Your Job

From mock customer-service scenarios to simulations of technical procedures, VR is branching out in the workplace.  

Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters

This Month in Urbanism

A sampling of city-focused events around the world. This month: housing policy, innovations in design and technology, urban watersheds, and more.

Population Reference Bureau

America’s Economic Distress Belt

Income inequality and poverty used to be separate phenomena in America. Today, it’s a different story: More than forty percent of U.S. counties have high rates of both.

Brendan McDermid/Reuters

How a Change to Military Benefits Will Affect Millions of Workers

The country’s largest employer—the U.S. military—is switching to a new retirement and savings system, with big consequences for troops and their families.

Year in Review
Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Don't Call it the Blacksonian: Lonnie Bunch on America's Best New Museum

The founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture talks about what comes next for a museum drawing historic crowds to Washington, D.C.

Carlos Osorio/AP

The Best Cityreads of 2016

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we’ve come across in the past 365 days.

Year in Review
Gary Hershorn/Reuters

2016: A Year Defined by America’s Diverging Economies

Just as income inequality has become a fixture in many Americans’ understanding of the country, so too must accelerating regional divides.

Courtesy of 25N Coworking

Why Co-Working Is Moving to the Suburbs

Shared work spaces are popping up far away from urban cores.

Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

For London, 2017 Could Be the Year That Makes or Breaks the City's Future

The U.K. capital debates the impact of Brexit—and much more.

Keith Bedford/Reuters

How New York Finally Found Its Place in the Tech Boom

After the initial hype fizzled, “Silicon Alley” thrived by playing to the city’s strengths as a financial powerhouse.