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Would You Pay $1,000 Once to Get Free Beer for Life?

A brewpub and a coffee shop in Minnesota's Twin Cities have used this one-time payment method to save their businesses. And there's no reason to think the model can't spread.

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The 'Vast Majority' of American Adults Are Overweight

The rest of the planet isn't doing so well staying skinny, either.

Reuters/China Daily

China's Fight Against Pollution Is Good For the Air But Bad For the Economy (For Now)

Chinese policymakers are getting so serious about air pollution that their efforts are hurting GDP performance.

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Being Poor Can Also Affect the Type of Cancer You Get

Living in poverty is associated with higher-mortality cancers, say scientists.

Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Being Poor Makes You Sick

Some patients are being "prescribed" bicycles and groceries as doctors attempt to treat the lifestyle consequences of poverty.

Videos
Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks

Why Libraries Matter

Over the last decade, attendance at New York City libraries' free programs jumped 88 percent to 2.5 million.

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Pathogens Can Live for a Week in Airplane Seat-Back Pockets

Disease-causing bacteria like MRSA and E. coli are remarkably good at surviving the in-flight environment.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

USPS Mail Carriers Are Also Collecting Crucial Housing Data

The U.S. Postal Service compiles information on every address in the country almost every day. Here's what they do with the numbers.

John Gress/Reuters

Dog Bites Man in Some Cities More Than Others

Is your city one of the dog bite–iest—at least when it comes to postal workers—in the nation?

Maps
AP

The Uneven U.S. Jobs Recovery Is Even Clearer When Tracked Per Capita

California added 900,000 new jobs during the recovery, but they were spread over the state's 38 million residents.

Reuters/Robert Galbraith

The Mysterious Death of Entrepreneurship in America

A tale of two definitions of entrepreneur—one thriving, one flailing.

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Living Near Foreclosed Property Is Linked to Elevated Blood Pressure

Researchers say lender-owned foreclosures could be causing neighbors too much stress.  

Reuters

Countdown to Brazil's World Cup

From soccer-themed public art projects to social unrest, the FIFA tournament is already visible all over the country.

Maps
AP

Mapping Three Decades of Rising Income Inequality, State by State

U.S. income inequality increased 15 percent between 1979 and 2012, but the story varies across different parts of the country.

Christopher T. Martin

Can Atlanta Go All In on the BeltLine?

The project's been a huge early success, but the mass transit component is lagging, and there are already affordability concerns along completed portions of the trail. 

Next Economy
Reena Flores/National Journal

This Decrepit Lot Is the Future Site of the World's Largest Urban Greenhouse

A 100,000-square-foot facility in D.C.'s Anacostia will produce 1 million pounds of produce a year and provide up to 25 permanent jobs.

Reuters

The Rate of New Business Formation Has Fallen By Almost Half Since 1978

America's declining "business dynamism" has affected all 50 states and nearly every single metro area.

AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan

China's Mega-Cities Are Combining Into Mega-Regions, but They're Doing It Wrong

Building around a small number of city centers can mean even more hellish pollution, traffic, and property prices.