Work

Recology

One City's Trash Is Artistic Treasure

Inside the artist-in-residence program at the San Francisco dump.

Stokkete / Shutterstock.com

The College of Lost Arts

A small college in Charleston, South Carolina, seeks to revive the centuries-old fine building trades.

Courtesy of the Pullman Museum

The Town That Laid the Foundation for America's Civil Rights Movement

The Pullman area of Chicago has been declared a national monument.

Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr

Oregon Homebrewers Get Set to Experiment With 'Sewerage Brewerage'

Portland's water department will get to show off just how good its super-pure recycled wastewater is.

AP images

Instead of the Income Gap We Should Be Talking About the Wealth Gap

And these 8 charts explain why.

Maps
Reuters/Kevork Djansezian

The Geography of Box Office Success

In honor of the Oscars, we tried mapping where 2014's biggest movies were set and shot. What we learned surprised us.

Russian Railways

The Sochi Light Rail Is the Most Epic Failure in Olympic History

Russian oligarchs who helped finance the most expensive Olympics in history are shedding their shares of the line, leaving it barely running.

Next Economy
Flickr/pixonomy

How Much Do Waiters Really Earn in Tips?

Gratuities, often paid in cash, are hard to track. A new report sheds light on an estimated $11 billion of annual unreported income.

Next Economy
Reuters/Mark Blinch

The Richest Cities for Young People: 1980 vs. Today

History often intervenes with extrapolated trends, making it hard to predict what the best cities for young people will be in the future.

Storefront for Art and Architecture / Flickr

Why Big Cities Promote Less Innovation Than They Once Did

When it comes to new ideas, city size may not matter as much today as it did in the past.

Migration Policy Institute

A 'Disheartening Portrait' of the U.S. Labor Force

American workers have a major skills deficit that varies by race, ethnicity, and nativity.

Shutterstock

The Peculiar Way New Orleans Warps Time: Best #Cityreads of the Week

A roundup of the best stories on cities and urbanism we've come across in the last seven days.

Photos
The Jerde Partnership

Remembering America's Mall Maestro, Jon Jerde

America has lost a titan of design and planning. It's time that everyone learned his name.

Next Economy
Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach

Where Have All the Construction Workers Gone?

Nevada now employs 60 percent fewer construction workers than it did during the housing boom. Some found new careers. Others left the country.

Dppowell/Wikipedia

Why Is America Dotted with Giant, Concrete Arrows?

These old air-mail beacons are visible all over the land (if you know where to look).

Marinella Ruusunen/Restaurant Day

Restaurant Day Has Become a Big Deal, Just Not in the U.S.

The pop-up food event that started in Helsinki four years ago has already spread to 68 countries around the world.

CityFixer
Washington State DOT / Flickr

America's Infrastructure Crisis Is Really a Maintenance Crisis

Here's what we can do about it.

NASA

Louisiana's Threatened Coast Is Growing Patches of New Land

Is this an encouraging sign in the fight against rising sea levels?