Work

Associated Press

New York's Rat Population Is Far Smaller Than You Might Guess

The latest tally of the city's rat horde dispels the myth that the city is home to "one rat per person."

Youth Speaks

In San Francisco, the Fight Against Diabetes Gets Personal

A local doctor tries to raise awareness about the social causes of Type 2 diabetes, in his community and others.

Aurora Almendral

The Woman Who Brought Water, Then Jobs, to a Manila Slum

When Patricia Herrera got a water hookup for the community of Farola, it was only the beginning.

Flickr/fotoscanon/

The Restaurant Industry's Secret Shame: An Utter Lack of Diversity in the Best-Paying Jobs

Raising the minimum wage and changing workplace culture could help.

Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Dying at Work—and From Overwork

Eleven Americans perish each day at their place of employment. But in other developed countries, work itself is the killer.

Photos

A Wonderfully Crass Look at the Party People of London's Shoreditch 'Hood

Street photographer Dougie Wallace delves into the "total f------ chaos" of the popular British nightlife spot.

Neighborhood Centers

How to Tackle Growing Suburban Poverty

Houston's Neighborhood Centers has spent years addressing this hidden problem—which will spread throughout the U.S.

Flickr/La Citta Vita

Where Does the Creative Class Move?

D.C., Boston, San Francisco, Seattle, New York, Houston, and Dallas draw those with "symbolic knowledge."

Dan Ox/Flickr

The Life and Death of the Great American Halloween Pop-Up Store

What can the vicissitudes of a very nichey (and spooky) industry teach us about the economic recovery?

Aaron Coury

He's Not Bitter (Much)

With The Bitter Southerner, editor Chuck Reece and his creative team explore the contradictions of the modern South.

Flickr/Eduardo Gavina

As Africa's Cities Change, So Does Youth Slang

Whether Sheng or Town Bemba, informal languages are giving the continent's urban youth culture a voice.

How Andrew Carnegie Built the Architecture of American Literacy

The philanthropist covered the U.S. in libraries between 1893 and 1919. How many survive—and the forms they've taken—points to what kind of structures make a city center.

California High-Speed Rail

Moving Forward with America's High-Speed Rail Projects

A status report on proposed lines in California, Texas, and the Northeast.

Flickr/mSeattle

How Racial Equity Can Make Cities Richer

The largest metros would have seen a 24 percent bump in economic growth in 2012 if racial employment disparities didn't exist.

Ophelia photos/Flickr Creative Commons

Why Are Scary Clowns Stalking Around Britain and France?

Halloween isn't much of a tradition there, yet they've been spotted year-round for a while now. What do they want?

Aly Song/Reuters

Treating Fido Like Family in China

Mary Peng advocates for the welfare of the rapidly growing number of "companion animals" in Chinese cities.

Maps
SigActs

Mapping Where Jimmy John's Ex-Employees Are Forbidden to Make Sandwiches

It might be simpler to mark where an ex-Jimmy Johnner CAN legally put meat on sub roll.

Reuters/Jonathan Alcorn

Large Metros Have Generated the Lion's Share of Employment Since the Great Recession

Are big, successful cities the new normal?