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Mike Hutchings/Reuters

This Month in Urbanism: March 2017

A sampling of city-focused events around the world. This month: bikes, land, water and mayors.

City of San Diego

The Key to San Diego's Water Independence: Sewage

The city’s ambitious Pure Water project aims to combat drought and harsh economics with reclaimed wastewater. But first, the public will have to get used to the idea.

Gregory Bull/AP

Almost 200 Firms Are Interested in Building Trump's Wall

More may answer the call when the federal government lists its formal solicitation on March 6.

Alex Brandon/AP

Trump's Wall Is Moving Forward Now, But It's Still Impossible

The government seeks contractors for design prototypes of a border wall with Mexico, a project that’s (probably!) still a pipe dream.

Mike Segar/Reuters

Why Millions of Americans Never Finish College

Across the country, the same hurdles keep students from obtaining degrees, often putting middle-class jobs with good wages out of reach.

Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Don't Dismiss the Early Signs of a Turnaround in Detroit

The Motor City faces monumental challenges, but it’s too often criticized for its glimmers of hope.

Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

The Stubborn Problem of Ageism in Hiring

When older adults expect to encounter age discrimination, it can set off a cycle that leads to long-term unemployment.

Seth Wenig/AP

How One Nonprofit Breaks the Cycle of Incarceration

Staffed mostly by ex-offenders, New York’s Fortune Society works to build a safety net for its clients, even before they’re released from jail or prison.

Routes North/Flickr

What's Wrong With Sweden?

The bizarre Twitter assault on the Scandinavian nation’s immigration policies may be based on a fiction—but that doesn’t mean all is well in Malmö.

Maps
NYPL

When Lager Reigned

1880s Manhattan was a beery paradise, according to a teetotaling cartographer.

John Minchillo/AP

What Should Cities Make?

President Trump is gung-ho about the U.S. producing more goods. But what, exactly, should cities be making in the 21st century?

Jasin Boland/Legendary Pictures and Universal Pictures

Epic Boondoggles, Ranked

It’s not the Big Dig or the Second Avenue Subway. America’s biggest infrastructure quagmires are much, much larger than that.

Dave Kaup/Reuters

When the Machines Take Our Jobs, Will We Be Freed?

MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson on the automated future of work.

Gary Cameron/Reuters

The Cities That Will Feel a 'Day Without Immigrants'

In addition to being key to creative work, immigrants contribute enormously in the working-class and services sectors of the economy.

Erin Siegal/Reuters

America's Lost Talent

The future of many American cities—and of the nation itself—depends on the skills of foreign-born workers. The Trump administration’s anti-immigration policies could spell economic disaster.

Courtesy of IHHE

Learning the Business Lessons of Hip Hop

At Philadelphia’s new Institute of Hip Hop Entrepreneurship, aspiring businesspeople hone their skills with the guidance of hip hop artists and moguls.

Jim Young/Reuters

Welcome to the 'Great Divergence'

Before 1980, places in America with lower average incomes grew faster than their richer counterparts, so that incomes converged. Today, that’s no longer the case.

Facebook/Tishaura Jones

Understanding a St. Louis Mayoral Candidate's Viral Takedown of a Local Newspaper

Just in case you have any questions about Tishaura Jones’s letter slamming the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s editorial board, CityLab has you covered.