Amanda Kolson Hurley

Amanda Kolson Hurley is a freelance writer based in Washington, D.C.

The Salk Institute, near San Diego

This Is Your Brain on Architecture

In her new book, Sarah Williams Goldhagen presents scientific evidence for why some buildings delight us and others—too many of them—disappoint.

Why Is the Alt-Right So Angry About Architecture?

Conservatives have long opposed Modernism, but in the video age, avant-garde buildings can become potent symbols in the hands of groups like Infowars and the NRA.

The Military Declares War on Sprawl

The Pentagon thinks better designed, more walkable bases can help curb obesity and improve troops’ fitness.

Undecorating Art Deco

A team of architects tried to understand the appeal of New York City’s most-loved buildings by recreating them for the 21st century.

Host Kevin McCloud, right, with Rob Hodgson and Kay Ralph at their cliffside house in Wales

The Show That Fuses Architectural Critique With Real-Estate Porn

Smarter than HGTV and livelier than PBS, the British program ‘Grand Designs’ celebrates architectural problem-solving.

Can Silicon Valley Kick the Sprawl Habit?

The Bay Area’s knowledge jobs are dispersed across a vast, car-choked landscape of suburban office parks. And that’s the way the industry likes it.

What If McMansions Ruled the World?

In the new book Atlas of Another America, architect Keith Krumwiede mixes satire, sci-fi, and the sublime in his plans for utopian villages built out of suburban mega-homes.

What Should Cities Make?

President Trump is gung-ho about the U.S. producing more goods. But what, exactly, should cities be making in the 21st century?

The Power of the Airport Protest

President Trump’s ban on immigration from several Muslim countries triggers mass demonstrations at airports nationwide.

How Adult Job Training Can Help Kids Learn

At one charter school in Washington, D.C., grown-ups work alongside children in an unusual two-generation model.

Introducing City Makers: Getting to Work

Our new series on the workforce and jobs of the future.

The Best of 'City Makers: Global Shifts'

Which of the innovations covered in our series will prove transformative?

When Integrating the Suburbs Isn't Enough

In Minnesota’s Twin Cities region, fair housing advocates are engaged in a fierce debate over just how much race matters.

The Problem of Resegregation in Suburbia

A Minnesota law professor says racial integration is the key to stable and prosperous suburbs.

Why Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, Is the New Face of Suburbia

After a period of rapid diversification, the town outside the Twin Cities faces rising poverty and housing challenges.

The Quiet Progress of U.S. Border Station Design

Attractive border stations by leading architects have now been a priority through the last three presidential administrations.

Faces of a Flood-Stricken World

Gideon Mendel’s portraits of flood victims, from Thailand to Germany to Haiti, reveal the personal devastation caused by natural disasters.

Why Your Grandma Loves Pickleball

The fast-growing sport is a hybrid of tennis, ping pong, and badminton—and seniors are crazy for it.

Why Aren't There More Energy-Efficient Buildings?

Data from an initiative to make architecture more sustainable shows progress, but there’s still a long way to go to make a dent in climate-change risks.

What It's Like to Be Hearing Impaired in a Big, Dense City

An artist tackles the challenges of navigating dense urban areas with hearing loss.

The Subtle Shifts in Retirement Community Designs

Del Webb, the country’s biggest builder of “active adult” housing, is changing its formula to appeal to Baby Boomers.