Amanda Kolson Hurley

Amanda Kolson Hurley is a contributing editor at CityLab.

Michael Graves with his Alessi teakettle

The Many Sides of Michael Graves

A new biography of the architect tells of his rise from small-town Indiana to partnerships with Disney and Target, and how disability shaped his outlook.

A rendering of a wooden skyscraper

The Eco-Friendly Wooden Skyscrapers of the Future

This change to the urban skyline could make a big dent in carbon emissions.

Detroit's 1924 Book-Cadillac Hotel in Detroit during a renovation in 2008.

7 Landmarks Saved by the Historic Tax Credit

The GOP’s tax reform bill has put the federal historic tax credit on the chopping block. Here are just a few of the buildings it helped revive since 1978.

550 Madison Avenue, as reimagined by Snøhetta

Will a Postmodern Icon Be 'Glasswashed'?

A plan by the design firm Snøhetta to remake Philip Johnson’s AT&T Building has sparked anger in the architecture world.

A table full of coloring books and colored pencils

Can Coloring Books Demystify Bike-Lane Design?

To share concepts from its “low-stress” bicycle master plan, Montgomery County, Maryland, chose the ultimate stress-busting medium of the coloring book.

Designing for a Better Democracy

From graphic explainers of government regulations to board-game-style community workshops, new MacArthur Fellow Damon Rich uses design to make cities more democratic.

A Look Back at the Suburbs of Toronto

A new exhibit explores postwar life in the suburbs of Canada’s largest city.

Octopuses Are Urbanists, Too

Scientists were surprised to find that this smart and solitary species had built a cephalopod city. Why?

A group of deer pass through a yard in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

The Deer in Your Yard Are Here to Stay

The deer population of the eastern U.S. has exploded and cities are trying to keep it in check. But the options available to them are limited, and fraught.

The Salk Institute, near San Diego

This Is Your Brain on Architecture

In her new book, Sarah Williams Goldhagen presents scientific evidence for why some buildings delight us and others—too many of them—disappoint.

Why Is the Alt-Right So Angry About Architecture?

Conservatives have long opposed Modernism, but in the video age, avant-garde buildings can become potent symbols in the hands of groups like Infowars and the NRA.

The Military Declares War on Sprawl

The Pentagon thinks better designed, more walkable bases can help curb obesity and improve troops’ fitness.

Undecorating Art Deco

A team of architects tried to understand the appeal of New York City’s most-loved buildings by recreating them for the 21st century.

Host Kevin McCloud, right, with Rob Hodgson and Kay Ralph at their cliffside house in Wales

The Show That Fuses Architectural Critique With Real-Estate Porn

Smarter than HGTV and livelier than PBS, the British program ‘Grand Designs’ celebrates architectural problem-solving.

Can Silicon Valley Kick the Sprawl Habit?

The Bay Area’s knowledge jobs are dispersed across a vast, car-choked landscape of suburban office parks. And that’s the way the industry likes it.

What If McMansions Ruled the World?

In the new book Atlas of Another America, architect Keith Krumwiede mixes satire, sci-fi, and the sublime in his plans for utopian villages built out of suburban mega-homes.

What Should Cities Make?

President Trump is gung-ho about the U.S. producing more goods. But what, exactly, should cities be making in the 21st century?

The Power of the Airport Protest

President Trump’s ban on immigration from several Muslim countries triggers mass demonstrations at airports nationwide.

How Adult Job Training Can Help Kids Learn

At one charter school in Washington, D.C., grown-ups work alongside children in an unusual two-generation model.

Introducing City Makers: Getting to Work

Our new series on the workforce and jobs of the future.

The Best of 'City Makers: Global Shifts'

Which of the innovations covered in our series will prove transformative?