Ariel Aberg-Riger

Ariel Aberg-Riger

Ariel Aberg-Riger is a self-taught artist and visual storyteller who lives in Buffalo. By day, she works as a Creative Director in New York.

A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.

The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

'The City Needed Them Out'

When wealthy New Yorkers decided to build Central Park, they eliminated an egalitarian community known as Seneca Village.

'We Thought We Would Be Ruled By Robots'

American crow populations are swelling in cities. Perhaps by better understanding them we can better understand ourselves.

'A Neighborhood Is Alive and Fluid'

Mr. Rogers showed viewers a place filled with interactions and a framework for being and becoming.

'Into This Chaos Came the Bicycle'

Owning two wheels in the late 19th century meant a literal means to escape, creating a “new woman” who eschewed fragility.

'No One Really Wants to Talk About It'

Despite recent progress, South Carolina still has a domestic violence problem.

'It Didn't Pump Itself'

The Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company was wildly successful, but the key to its profits lay in a deadly contract negotiated with the State of Alabama in 1888.

'You Made Me. And I'm Coming for You.'

Lake Erie is cleaner now that it was during the Rust Belt’s industrial heyday. But all is not well underwater.

'How Does One Undam?'

A trip back to Sheffield, Alabama, is filled with reminders that boundaries aren't just physical.