Brentin Mock

Brentin Mock

Brentin Mock is a staff writer at CityLab. He was previously the justice editor at Grist.

The Slave Revolt Reenactment Taking Over New Orleans

On November 8 and 9, costumed black people with replica guns will march across Louisiana reenacting one of the largest slave rebellions in U.S. history.

Mitch Landrieu at a podium with people behind him.

What Mitch Landrieu Learned About Racism in the American South

The former New Orleans mayor’s report back from his 11-month tour of the South reveals that racism in the region might be deeper than he imagined.

CityLab's Brentin Mock talks to Beto O'Rourke in Erie, Pennsylvania.

Beto O’Rourke’s $1.5 Trillion Climate Plan Is Serious on Environmental Justice

In an interview with CityLab, the 2020 presidential candidate spells out a climate policy that is overtly attentive to race.

An old apartment building and empty lot and new modern construction

Who Will Presidential Candidates' Redlining Plans Actually Benefit?

Housing plans by Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, and Pete Buttigieg intend redress for racist redlining housing practices, but who will actually benefit?

Steven Reed at podium with people behind him.

It’s Not Just Steven Reed: Black Mayors Are Winning the South

Can Steven Reed, the first black mayor in Montgomery, Alabama, reconcile the city's civil rights legacy and racial justice needs with its Confederate past?

A Homecoming Through Art for Pittsburgh’s Historic Hill District

Njaimeh Njie’s art series honoring black lives in Pittsburgh’s Hill District emerges as reports show that black lives haven’t mattered much in the city.

A woman looks straight at camera with others people and trees in background.

Pittsburgh: A ‘Most Livable’ City, but Not for Black Women

Pittsburgh is the worst place for black women to live in for just about every indicator of livability, says the city’s Gender Equity Commission.

Why Flood Victims Blame Their City, Not the Climate

Cities may struggle to gain support for climate action plans because they haven’t dealt with infrastructure issues that regularly afflict residents.

black children walking by a falling-down building

White Americans’ Hold on Wealth Is Old, Deep, and Nearly Unshakeable

White families quickly recuperated financial losses after the Civil War, and then created a Jim Crow credit system to bring more white families into money.

A portrait of Jay-Z.

The Roots of Jay-Z’s ‘Black Capitalism’

Now partnering with the NFL, Jay-Z centers wealth-building in his activism, as many African Americans have before him—but without much success.

What U.S. Cities Facing Climate Disaster Risks Are Least Prepared?

New studies find cities most vulnerable to climate change disasters—heat waves, flooding, rising seas, drought—are the least prepared.

Children holding signs.

The Racism Behind Trump's New ‘Public Charge’ Immigration Policy, Explained

The changes to the “public charge” rule fit into a long history of attempting to restrict immigration based on race and ethnicity.

A photo of a Dayton police office's gun holster

State Preemption of Local Legislation Is Getting Worse

A new report shows that state legislatures have been expanding their reach in preempting cities from localized regulation on issues like gun control.

A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.

What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

a photo of Rep. Elijah Cummings marching with local leaders in Baltimore in 2015.

Trump Wants to Police Black Cities

The president’s Twitter attack on Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings reflect a law-and-order manifesto with a long history.

No, Puerto Rico’s New Climate-Change Law Is Not a ‘Green New Deal’

Puerto Rico just adopted legislation that commits it to generating all its power from renewable sources. Here’s what separates that from what’s going on in D.C.

A large sculpture of a hockey player next to the Prudential Center in Newark, where the New Jersey Devils hockey team plays. In the background, signs can be seen for Dinosaur Bar-B-Cue BBQ and Rock Plaza Lofts luxury apartments.

Where Gentrification Is an Emergency, and Where It’s Not

Gentrification is geographically limited in cities, but a new study shows where it has become a crisis, particularly for low-income black households.

Farmer in tractor with sign reading "black farmers still waiting for justice" taped to it.

IRS Audits Target the Wealth-Depleted Southern Black Belt

The racially discriminatory IRS audits revealed in a new report are yet another way of depleting and plundering the wealth of southern black families.

Protesters in downtown Pittsburgh.

In Police Violence, the Fates of Cities and Suburbs Are Intertwined

Former East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld was acquitted for killing black teen Antwon Rose. This has ramifications for the greater Pittsburgh area.

Why Can’t We Close the Racial Wealth Gap?

A new study says that income inequality, not historic factors, feeds the present-day gulf in wealth between white and black households.

Walter Gibson wears two rifles strapped to his back

Will Pittsburgh’s Gun Control Laws Get More Black People Killed?

African Americans worry that Pittsburgh’s new gun control proposals could leave them more vulnerable to racist and state-sponsored violence.