Derek Thompson

Derek Thompson

Derek Thompson is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, technology, and the media. He is the author of Hit Makers and the host of the podcast Crazy/Genius.

American Migration Patterns Should Terrify the GOP

Millennial movers have hastened the growth of left-leaning metros in southern red states such as Texas, Arizona, and Georgia. It could be the biggest political story of the 2020s.

How Democrats Conquered the City

The 150-year history of how a once-rural party became synonymous with density.

Why Are America’s Three Biggest Metros Shrinking?

After a post-recession boomlet, the New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago areas are all seeing their population decline.

The New Servant Class

“Wealth work” is one of America’s fastest growing industries. That’s not entirely a good thing.

The Future of the City Is Childless

America’s urban rebirth is missing something key—actual births.

Carpenters frame a wall.

America’s Housing Crisis Could Imperil Trump’s Presidency

Many of the administration’s most famous policies are impediments to affordable construction.

What’s Really Happening to Retail?

Manhattan’s shuttered storefronts tell a larger American story: Only Amazon-proof businesses can now survive in brick and mortar.

A photo shows the Amazon logo on a building.

Amazon’s HQ2 Spectacle Isn’t Just Shameful—It Should Be Illegal

Each year, local governments spend nearly $100 billion to move headquarters and factories between states. It’s a wasteful exercise that requires a national solution.

How Manhattan Became a Rich Ghost Town

New York’s empty storefronts are a dark omen for the future of cities.

A sculpture of the Airbnb logo is pictured.

Airbnb and the Unintended Consequences of 'Disruption'

Tech analysts are prone to predicting utopia or dystopia. They’re worse at imagining the side effects of a firm's success.

The Amazon-ification of Whole Foods

There’s a broader strategy behind two-hour delivery for heirloom tomatoes.

People are pictured inspecting beer.

Craft Beer Is the Strangest, Happiest Economic Story in America

Corporate goliaths are taking over the U.S. economy, yet small breweries are thriving. Why?

Registered nurse Tara McCormick demonstrates an infrared thermometer at West Virginia University Hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia on September 6, 2017.

Why Nerds and Nurses Are Taking Over the U.S. Economy

A blockbuster report from government economists forecasts the workforce of 2026—a world of robot cashiers, well-paid math nerds, and so (so, so, so) many healthcare workers.

Customer enters Sears store with "Store Closing" signs on windows

Sears Was the Amazon of Its Time—Until It Made Preventable Mistakes

In the middle of the 20th century, Sears accounted for a full percentage point of U.S. GDP. By the early 21st century, it was in steep decline. What happened?

The History of Sears Predicts Nearly Everything Amazon Is Doing

One hundred years ago, a retail giant that shipped millions of products by mail moved swiftly into the brick-and-mortar business, changing it forever. Is that happening again?

Restaurant patrons are pictured.

Restaurant Jobs Are the New Factory Jobs

Food-service jobs are eating the economy. Maybe that’s not a good thing.

Sarah E. Harvey's painting of "Winsted, Connecticut," showing homes and buildings among green hills

What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut?

Conservatives say the state has a tax problem. Liberals say it has an inequality problem. What it really has is a city problem.

A woman standing near the fruit isle in a grocery store.

Amazon's Bet on the Future of Commerce

With a plan to buy Whole Foods, the retailer’s $14 billion wager isn’t just about the future of food. It’s about the future of shopping—especially for rich urban consumers.

A girl carries an inflatable tube.

Teenagers Have Stopped Getting Summer Jobs. Why?

Most used to work in July and August. Now the vast majority don’t. Are they being lazy, or strategic?

A package moves along a conveyer belt at Amazon's fulfillment center in DuPont, Washington.

Amazon Makes Its Pitch to Low-Income Shoppers

The retail giant is slashing membership fees for families on federal welfare.

Elon Musk

Is Tesla Really the Future of Cars?

The auto industry’s fate rides on the answers to three unresolved questions: driven or self-driving? Electric or gas? Private or shared?