Emily Badger

Emily Badger is a former staff writer at CityLab. Her work has previously appeared in Pacific StandardGOODThe Christian Science Monitor, and The New York Times. She lives in the Washington, D.C. area.

Taxi Drivers Miffed Over Uber and Lyft Just Sued the City of Chicago

They say they're trying to protect riders.

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County

People are leaving Minneapolis for Florida, Detroit for the suburbs, and Washington for New York.

Yes, Rent Is Rising Much Faster in America's Tech Hubs

But Internet companies and their high-paid web developers are only part of the story.

What We Can Learn by Tracking the Movements of Fashion Designers

The results reveal the power of agglomeration as we've never been able to see it before.

This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It

An experiment from Nairobi with implications for the urbanizing world.

The Stubborn Persistence of America's Digital Divide

The quarter of households without Internet are disproportionately made up of families with less income and education.

Why We Shouldn't Obsess Over the Falling Homeownership Rate

The economy doesn't need more homeowners right now. It needs more households.

Why Anti-Big Box Laws May Actually Be Bad For Small Retailers

The real threat doesn't come from the Walmart Supercenter. It comes from Walmart Express.

Why the Real Estate Industry Is Interested in Drones, Too

They're quickly changing the art of visualizing buildings.

How to Tell If We're Really Entering Another Housing Bubble

Recent claims that we're already there may be overstated.

This Map Wants to Change How You Think About Your Commute

With the help of 4.2 trillion points of data.

The Wrongful Death Suit That Could Finally Define Uber

Questions over just who can be held liable in the "sharing economy" are coming to a head.

Why Chicago Wants to Turn a Struggling Neighborhood Into a National Park

Officials want to turn Pullman, America's first company town, into a historic hotspot for tourists. Will they come?

The U.S. Has a Social Mobility Problem, But Not the One You Think

A child's chances of reaching the middle class aren't declining. But whether they get there depends a lot on where they live.

Americans Are Deeply Divided Over What Causes Poverty in the First Place

Which makes doing something about it all the more difficult.