Feargus O'Sullivan

Feargus O'Sullivan

Feargus O'Sullivan is a contributing writer to CityLab, covering Europe. His writing focuses on housing, gentrification and social change, infrastructure, urban policy, and national cultures. He has previously contributed to The Guardian, The Times, The Financial Times, and Next City, among other publications.

A Modest Proposal to Eliminate 11,000 Urban Parking Spots

Amsterdam plans to systematically strip its center of parking spaces in the coming years, making way for bike lanes, sidewalks, and more trees.

Why Transport Ministers Get to Decide the Fate of Europe’s Clocks

The European Union is set to abandon daylight saving time in 2021. Here’s why transportation officials have a final say on making it happen.

Photographing Istanbul’s Charming Painted Signs

Captured in a new book, they serve as a delightful snapshot into the city’s recent history.

Homes in Amsterdam are pictured.

Amsterdam's Plan: If You Buy a Newly Built House, You Can't Rent It Out

In an effort to make housing more affordable, the Dutch capital is crafting a law that says anyone who buys a newly built home must live in it themselves.

Cities Deserve Better Than These Thomas Heatherwick Gimmicks

The “Vessel” at New York’s Hudson Yards—like so many of his designs—look as if the dystopian world of 1984 has been given a precious makeover.

Why Berlin Is Giving Women a Discount on Public Transit

The German capital is celebrating Equal Pay Day with the Frauenticket, a discounted fare that reflects the gender pay gap.

In Need of Housing, Barcelona Fines Landlords For Long-Vacant Buildings

The massive fines levied against the investment funds have been interpreted as a “declaration of war” from Mayor Ada Colau, who wants more affordable housing.

Dessau Made the Bauhaus, the Bauhaus Made Dessau

It was a perfect setting for a movement that wanted to cross over the boundary between art and technology. Today, it survives on a different kind of creativity.

People stand on Paris's Rue Cremieux

Their Street Is Famous on Instagram, and They Can't Take It Anymore

Instagrammers love the colorful homes on Paris’s Rue Crémieux. Frustrated residents want gates to lock them out.

Berlin Will Spend €2 Billion Per Year to Improve Public Transit

The German capital plans to make major investments to expand bus and rail networks, boost frequency, and get ahead of population growth. Are you jealous yet?

The Cheaper, Greener Future of France's High-Speed Trains

Take a look at the trains that will modernize France’s rail fleet and prepare the national provider to take on its first-ever competitors.

The Good, Bad, and Ugly Public Transit Seat Covers of the World

An international roundup of bus, train, and subway seat designs, based on CityLab’s rules for a commuter-friendly textile.

Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

Tate Modern Visitors Can Keep Looking Into Rich People’s Condos, Legally

The decision by the British High Court was an abrupt end to a heavily publicized stand-off between private wealth and a public art institution.

Why Edinburgh Wants a Tourist Tax

Scotland’s capital could charge travelers £2 per day—and don’t be surprised if other U.K. cities follow its lead.

A photo of Londoners walking past piles of trash during a 1979 garbage strike.

Britain’s Post-Brexit Future May Stink

A new “No Deal Brexit” threat emerges in the U.K.: overflowing piles of garbage and livestock waste.

Paris Will Finally Let You Have a Little Fun in Public Parks

Bikes, games, picnics, and dogs are finally getting a warmer welcome in the French capital’s famously stringent parks and gardens.

a photo of police officers of Mossos d'Esquadra during an anti-terrorist operation in Barcelona, where crime has been on the rise.

Amid Tourists and Gentrification, Barcelona Faces a Crime Wave

The city’s historic district, Ciutat Vella, is seeing a rise in street crime. What’s driving it?   

London’s Surprisingly Rich History of Transit Textile Design

London Transport Museum’s wonderfully nerdy archive commemorates an aspect of the city’s appearance that has long been both omnipresent and scarcely noticed.

A woman rides a bike past a bank in Italy.

An Italian City Will Pay Residents to Ride Bikes

Similar plans have been tried in Paris, Milan, and elsewhere with mixed results. So will Bari’s cash-to-cycle program find success?